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Splitting Apart: American Polarization, Part 1

This is part one of a two-part series on polarization in America. This post focuses on Americans' views on, and roles in, polarization. Part two addresses the systemic causes of polarization that result from our ... Read Now >

Opinion

NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist Poll Results & Analysis

In the contest for the Democratic nomination nationally, Bernie Sanders (31%) leads his closest competitor Michael Bloomberg (19%) by 12 points among Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate. Joe Biden (15%) and Elizabeth Warren (12%) follow. No other candidate receives double-digit support. When a similar question was reported in December, Biden received 24%, Sanders had 22%, and Warren had 17%. 13% supported Buttigieg, and Bloomberg’s support (4%) was in single digits.

“Sanders has solidified his lead over the Democratic field while Bloomberg’s air wars gives him a solid second place in the Democratic field,” Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion. “Meanwhile, Buttigieg and Klobuchar’s strong showings in Iowa and New Hampshire do not extend to the national Democratic electorate at this point, and all of the candidates have faded with the exception of Sanders and Bloomberg.”

Sanders’ base is intact. A majority of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents under the age of 45 years old (54%) and a plurality of those who identify as progressive (46%) support Sanders. However, Bloomberg has resonated among moderates and older Democrats. Bloomberg (29%) edges Biden (23%) among Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents who self-identify as moderate. Bloomberg (27%) has a similar advantage over Biden (22%) among those age 45 or older.

Warren is the second choice candidate of 23% of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents with a candidate preference, bolstered by 45% of Sanders’ supporters who say they would consider Warren as their second choice. Biden and Bloomberg swap support. 28% of Bloomberg’s backers say their second choice is Biden. The same proportion of Biden supporters (28%) say they would opt for Bloomberg.

A majority of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents (55%) say it is more important to have a nominee who has the best chance of defeating President Donald Trump in November. 42% say it is more important that the nominee shares their positions on most issues. These results are essentially unchanged from December when 54% said electability was the priority over 44% of the potential Democratic electorate who preferred a candidate that is closer to them on the issues. Supporters of Bloomberg (70%) and Biden (63%) are more likely than those of Sanders (38%) to consider electability to be more important. 60% of Sanders’ supporters prefer a candidate who shares their positions on the issues.

Despite their personal preferences, most Democrats and Democratic leaning independents are united in their desire to oust Trump from office. 76% say, if their candidate does not receive the nomination, they will vote for whomever the Democratic candidate is. Of note, Democrats (80%) are more cohesive in this position than those who identify as independents. 15% of independents report they will vote for someone else, and 12% say they will not cast a ballot for president.

In hypothetical general election tossups, Biden (50%) performs best against Trump (44%) among registered voters nationally. Bloomberg is +4 percentage points over the president while Sanders is up 3 points. Buttigieg and Klobuchar have a slim 2-point edge whereas Warren is +1 against the president.

President Trump’s job approval rating is consistent. 42% of Americans approve of how he is doing his job, including 29% who strongly approve. 51% disapprove, including 40% who are strongly of this view. The president’s approval rating is statistically unchanged from January when 41% of Americans approved of the job he was doing and 53% disapproved.

“Despite positive numbers on his handling of the economy and an improved outlook on the direction of the country, President Trump’s overall job approval rating has not changed,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion.

The president is viewed positively on his handling of the economy. 51% approve of his economic approach, and 40% disapprove. This is a 12-point shift since last September when 47% of adults nationally approved of how the president was handling the economy, and 48% disapproved.

Many Americans (66%) also perceive the economy to be working well for them personally. This opinion is due, in part, to the overwhelming perception of Republicans (93%) who consider the economy to be benefitting their wallets. 66% of independents agree. 29% of Americans, including a slim majority of Democrats (51%), do not think the economy is working well for them.

Americans are much more likely to have a favorable impression of a capitalist system than a socialist one. 57% of U.S. residents have a positive opinion of capitalism while a similar 58% have an unfavorable view of socialism.

Americans’ opinions about the direction of the nation have improved. 41% of residents think the nation is moving in the right direction. This is up from 35% last October and is the largest proportion of Americans with this view since March of 2012 (43%). 50% of Americans currently think the nation is moving in the wrong direction, down from 57% last time.

When thinking about November’s congressional elections, the Democratic candidate on the ballot (48%) has an 8-point advantage over the Republican (40%) among registered voters nationally. When last reported in November, the Democratic candidate (46%) was +5 points against the Republican (41%).

While a majority of Americans (53%) express a great deal or good amount of trust that elections are fair, this proportion has declined from 62% in January. 43% say they have little or no trust at all that the elections this year will be fair, up from 37% previously.

More than seven in ten Americans (72%), though, express confidence that their state or local government will run a fair and accurate election in 2020. This is a bump up from 68% last month.

Complete February 19, 2020 NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist Poll Release of the United States

Complete February 19, 2020 NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist Poll of the United States (Tables) 

Marist Poll Methodology

Nature of the Sample

NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist Poll Results: Election 2020

NBC News/Marist Poll Results of New Hampshire

As the clock ticks down to the New Hampshire primary, Bernie Sanders (25%) has a narrow advantage over Pete Buttigieg (21%) among likely Democratic primary voters statewide including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate or who have already voted. Both Sanders and Buttigieg have gotten a slight boost post Iowa. In the NBC News/Marist Poll in the state in January, Sanders received 22% to Buttigieg’s 17%. The next two candidates Warren (14%) and Biden (13%) receive about the same support as they did last time.

“It’s a close race which still has more than one in five persuadable voters, a notable proportion,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion. “But, Sanders and Buttigieg have picked up the pace. One significant change from January is that Buttigieg’s support has really solidified, although Sanders still commands the most loyal following.”

Sanders (41%) has a commanding lead among Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents who identify as progressive. Elizabeth Warren, his closest competitor among this group receives 22% followed by Buttigieg with 15%. Among those who identify as moderate, Buttigieg (30%) is +8 points over Biden (22%). Biden (26%) and Butigieig (24%) were in a statistical tie in last month’s survey. Klobuchar currently receives 15% among this group.

Sanders (35%) outpaces his rivals among likely Democratic voters under the age of 45. 18% of these voters support Warren, and 17% are for Buttigieg. Of note, more than four in ten members of Millennials and Gen Z (42%) are for Sanders. Among likely Democratic voters over the age of 45, Buttigieg (24%) is ahead of Sanders (18%) and Biden (16%).

Sanders (28%) has a double-digit lead over his closest competitor, Buttigieg (18%), among men. Buttigieg (24%) and Sanders (22%) are competitive among likely Democratic primary voters who are women.

62% of likely Democratic primary voters with a candidate preference, up from 56% previously, strongly support their choice of candidate. Supporters of Sanders (73%) are most enthusiastic.   Buttigieg enjoys a boost. 63% of those in Buttigieg’s camp, up from 44% previously, say they strongly support him. 60% of Biden backers say they will not waiver in their commitment. This is up slightly from 56%. A majority of those who are currently for Warren (56%) are firmly committed to her compared with 53% in January.

Half of likely Democratic primary voters (50%) say it is more important to have a nominee who has the best chance of defeating President Donald Trump in November than to have a nominee who is closest to them on the issues (42%). Not surprisingly, 58% of Democrats likely to vote in the primary say their priority is electability. In contrast, 51% of independents likely to cast a ballot in the Democratic primary believe it is more important to nominate a candidate who aligns with their views on the issues.

Among those who favor electability, Buttigieg (23%) and Biden (20%) are competitive. Sanders has 19% to 13% for Warren and 10% for Klobuchar. Sanders (30%) leads Buttigieg (20%) by 10 points among those who consider positions on the issues to be more important. Warren is the only other candidate who receives support in double digits (15%) among these voters.

On the Republican side, Trump trounces his primary opponents. Among likely Republican primary voters including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate or who have already voted, Trump (88%) outpaces Bill Weld (7%) and Joe Walsh (1%).

More than three in four likely Republican primary voters with a candidate preference (85%) say they strongly support their choice of candidate.

President Trump’s approval rating in New Hampshire is underwater. 44% of adults approve of his job performance. This includes 31% who strongly approve of how he is doing his job. A majority (51%) disapprove, including 43% who strongly do so. When last reported, 42% of New Hampshire adults approved of how the president was doing in office, and 52% disapproved.

New Hampshire registered voters divide about whether they prefer a Congress controlled by Republicans (45%) or Democrats (44%). Democrats (47%) had an advantage over Republicans (42%) in January.

Complete February 7, 2020 NBC News/Marist Poll Release of New Hampshire

Complete February 7, 2020 NBC News/Marist Poll of New Hampshire (Annotated Questionnaire)

Complete February 7, 2020 NBC News/Marist Poll of New Hampshire (Tables)

 Marist Poll Methodology

 Nature of the Sample

NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist Poll Results & Analysis

About two in three Americans perceive the coronavirus to be a real threat, and a majority express a great deal or good amount of concern about its potential spread in the United States. However, fewer Americans worry about its impact in their local community. More than six in ten Americans think U.S. government officials are doing enough to prevent the spread of the coronavirus in the United States.

66% of U.S. residents consider the coronavirus to be a real threat and not a situation that has been blown out of proportion (27%). Americans age 45 or older (72%) are more likely than younger Americans (57%) to think the coronavirus represents a real danger to people in the U.S.

A majority of Americans (56%) report they are either very concerned or concerned about the spread of the coronavirus in the United States. 43% are not very concerned or not concerned at all. Two in three Americans who are 45 years of age or older (66%) and women (64%) express a notable amount of concern about the contagion. This compares with 40% of younger Americans and 47% of men who worry that the coronavirus will spread here in the United States.

However, Americans are less concerned that the coronavirus will be an issue in their own backyards. A majority of Americans (55%) report they are not very concerned or not concerned at all that the illness will spread in their community. 44% are, at least, somewhat worried. Again, opinions fall along age and gender lines. Americans 45 or older (54%) are nearly twice as likely as those under 45 years old (28%) to be concerned. A majority of women (52%), compared with 35% of men, say they are very concerned or concerned that the coronavirus will spread in their community.

The coronavirus is having little impact on Americans’ travel plans. Only 1% report they have changed their travel plans due to the coronavirus.

Many Americans (61%) are confident that U.S. government officials are doing enough to prevent the spread of the coronavirus in the United States. 26% say they are not doing enough. Regardless of demographic group, at least a majority say they think government officials are taking enough action to protect the American people. Of note, men (67%) are more likely than women (54%) to have this view.

Media reports have had an impact on Americans’ awareness of the coronavirus. 68% report they have heard a great deal (42%) or good amount (27%) about the coronavirus. 32% have heard just a little (28%) or nothing at all (4%) about it.

Complete February 5, 2020 NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist Poll Release of the United States

Complete February 5, 2020 NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist Poll of the United States (Tables of Adults and Registered Voters)

Marist Poll Methodology

Nature of the Sample

NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist Poll Results

2/4: Coronavirus

NBC News/Marist Poll Results of New Hampshire

In the Democratic primary contest in New Hampshire, Bernie Sanders (22%) edges his closest competitor Pete Buttigieg (17%) by five points among likely voters statewide including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate or who have already voted. Joe Biden closely follows with 15%. Elizabeth Warren receives 13%, and Amy Klobuchar garners the support of 10%. No other candidate in the Democratic field receives double-digit support. 25% of likely Democratic primary voters are persuadable, that is they are either undecided or might change their mind in the closing weeks before the first-in-the-nation primary.

“Sanders’ advantage is bolstered by his strong support among progressive Democrats and younger voters,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion. “His supporters are also far more enthusiastic about his candidacy than backers of his closest rivals.”

Among likely Democratic primary voters who describe themselves as progressive, Sanders (36%) outpaces his closest competitor Warren (20%). Among likely Democratic primary voters in New Hampshire who identify as moderate, Biden (26%) and Buttigieg (24%) are favored. Klobuchar receives 15% with Sanders (9%) and Warren (8%) lagging behind.

Sanders is the preferred candidate among likely Democratic primary voters in New Hampshire who are under the age of 45 (39%), especially among Millennials and those in Gen Z (41%). Buttigieg (17%) and Warren (14%) are the only other candidates who achieves double-digit support among these younger voters. Sanders (26%) is also favored among likely Democratic primary voters who are men. Biden and Buttigieg receive 15% apiece among this group, and Warren has the support of 10%. Among women likely to vote in the Democratic primary, Sanders and Buttigieg receive an identical 19%. 15% support Biden, and 15% are for Warren.

Only 56% of likely Democratic voters with a candidate preference say they strongly support their choice of candidate. But, Sanders’ supporters outpace his competitors’ backers when it comes to enthusiasm for their candidate. 76% of Sanders’ voters strongly support him. 56% of Biden’s backers, 53% of Warren’s supporters, and 44% of Buttigieg’s voters strongly back their candidate.

49% of New Hampshire likely Democratic primary voters report it is more important that the Democratic nominee be the candidate who has the best chance of defeating President Donald Trump in November. Among those who value electability, Biden receives 23% followed by Buttigieg (21%), Klobuchar (14%), Warren (13%), and Sanders (11%). 42% say it is more important that the candidate come closest to their positions on the issues. Sanders (33%) outpaces his rivals Buttigieg (15%), Warren (13%), Gabbard (11%), Biden (6%), and Klobuchar (5%) among these voters.

On the Republican side, President Trump handily leads the Republican candidates posing a primary challenge to him. Among likely Republican primary voters in New Hampshire including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate or who already have voted, 87% support Trump. Bill Weld receives 8%, and Joe Walsh has 2%.

Among likely Republican voters with a candidate preference, more than eight in ten (82%) say they strongly support their choice of candidate in the Republican primary contest.

The top-tier Democratic candidates all lead President Trump in hypothetical general election matchups in New Hampshire. Buttigieg performs best against the incumbent president. He leads Trump by 10 points among New Hampshire registered voters. Both Biden and Sanders are +8 points against the president. Warren, the only Democratic top-tier candidate who fails to break 50%, has a slight 4-point edge over Trump.

“President Trump is pretty much getting only his approval rating in head-to-head matchups against the top-tier Democrats,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion.

President Trump’s job approval rating in New Hampshire is upside down. 42% of residents approve of the job the president is doing in office, including 29% who strongly have this opinion. 52%, including 43% who say they strongly do so, disapprove of how Trump is doing his job.

A plurality of New Hampshire registered voters (47%) say they would prefer a Congress controlled by Democrats rather than one controlled by Republicans (42%) following November’s elections. Partisan allegiances are solid. Among independent voters, a plurality (45%) prefer a Congress with Democrats at the helm. 37%, though, say they want the Republicans in control. A notable 18% of independents are unsure.

Complete January 26, 2020 NBC News/Marist Poll Release of New Hampshire

Complete January 26, 2020 NBC News/Marist Poll of the United States (Tables)

Marist Poll Methodology

Nature of the Sample

 

NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist Poll Results and Analysis

A majority of Americans (53%), including most Republicans (85%) and a slim majority of independents (51%), consider the United States to be prepared to keep November’s elections safe and secure. In contrast, more than four in ten Americans (41%), including two-thirds of Democrats (67%), do not think the nation is ready to fend off a threat to this year’s elections.

“Like so many issues, Americans view election security from opposite poles of the partisan divide,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion.

In addition, many Americans have a great deal or good amount of trust that elections are fair. Despite racial, gender, and age differences, at least a majority trust that the 2020 election will be accurate and that their state or local government will run a fair election.

In fact, Americans’ confidence in the fairness of U.S. elections has grown. More than six in ten (62%), up from 51% in October 2019, trust that elections are fair. 37% have not very much or no confidence at all that they will be fair. This is down from 46%.

About two in three Americans (68%) trust that the results of the 2020 election will be accurate. Of note, men (75%), white residents (73%), and Americans 45 or older (73%) are more likely than women (61%), non-white residents (61%), and younger Americans (62%) to say they have, at least, a good deal of confidence that the 2020 election will be accurate.

Similarly, 68% of residents are either confident or very confident that their state or local government will run a fair election in 2020. Again, white residents (74%) are more likely than non-white residents (58%) to have this view. Men (73%) are more likely than women (62%) to have confidence in their local officials to oversee a fair election process.

Confidence in the integrity of the 2020 elections is, in part, due to Americans’ impressions of the job the intelligence community is doing. A majority of Americans (53%) think the intelligence community has done a great deal or good amount since 2016 to make sure there is no interference from a foreign country in this year’s elections.

But, Americans are also wary of the potential for election year mayhem. Despite Americans’ trust in their state officials to conduct a fair election, residents are not confident these officials have done enough to safeguard the process from foreign interference. Only 42% of Americans, down from 51% last September, agree state officials have taken strides to protect the electoral process.

For many Americans, their concern about election interference from a foreign entity is due, in part, to what they see as the lack of effort by President Donald Trump to protect the vote from outside influences. Only 38% say the president has done a great deal or good amount to safeguard this year’s elections from foreign interference. This is identical to the 38% who had this view in 2018.

In fact, a slim majority of residents nationally (51%) think President Trump’s actions encourage election meddling. 39% of Americans say the president is making elections safer. Most Democrats (88%) and 51% of independents do not think the president is doing enough to thwart election interference while 78% of Republicans report he is ensuring the 2020 election results will be safe and secure.

“The devil is in the details regarding Americans’ concerns about the integrity of the 2020 presidential election,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion.

When asked to point to the biggest threat to election security, misleading information is mentioned by more than one in three Americans (35%). Voter fraud follows with 24%. 16% cite voter suppression, and 15% mention foreign interference. Five percent of residents believe problems at their polling place, such as long lines or broken machines, will be the biggest hindrance to keeping elections safe and accurate.

Not surprisingly, the focus of election concerns varies depending upon the partisan lens. The leading concern among Democrats is voter suppression (34%). More than one in four Democrats (27%) consider misleading information to be the biggest menace to election security. Foreign interference follows closely for these voters with 22%. In contrast, nearly half of Republicans (47%) believe voter fraud is the biggest challenge. Among independents, the pluralilty (39%) cite misleading information.

When taking into account specific efforts that may impede this year’s election process, 82% of Americans think it is likely they will encounter misleading information on social media sites. 77% believe it is likely foreign countries will be the source of disinformation about the candidates.

“Americans, across party lines, worry about another nation spreading disinformation during campaign 2020,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion. “Not so when it comes to a foreign power actually manipulating the vote. The partisan divide reappears.”

More than six in ten Republicans (62%), independents (79%), and Democrats (90%) agree it is likely foreign countries will spread false information about the candidates during the election campaign.  Democrats (54%), however, are more likely than independents (37%) and Republicans (19%) to think the vote count may actually be tampered with by a foreign country.

About six in ten Americans (59%) think it is hard to tell the difference between what is fact and what is misleading information. A majority (55%) say it will be harder to identify disinformation in 2020 than it was in 2016 except for Republicans. A majority of GOP voters (52%) say it will be easier to identify misleading information this election year than it was four years ago.

Americans (75%) lack confidence in technology platforms like Facebook, Twitter, Google and YouTube to prevent their being misused to spread false information during this year’s election. This is an increase from 66% in the fall of 2018 when The Pew Research Center’s American Trends Panel reported this question.

However, most Americans do not think the main responsibility for reducing the amount of public disinformation lies with these technology companies. 39% of Americans say it is the responsibility of the news media, 18% say it is the role of these technology platforms, and 15% say the onus is on the government. Another 12% say it is up to the public, and 12% don’t think it’s the responsibility of any of these groups.

A majority of Republicans (54%) point a finger at the news media for the amount of misleading information that is made public. 39% of independents and just 29% of Democrats agree. Regardless of party, Americans believe there is a likelihood that they will encounter misleading information on a social media site.

“Many Americans think election cycles are no longer on the up-and-up,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion. “These opinions are a troublesome sign about this keystone of our democracy.”

A majority of Americans (52%) think there is a likelihood there will be voter fraud. Fewer, yet still notable, proportions of residents say it is likely many votes will not actually be counted (44%) or that many people will show up to vote and will be told they are not eligible (43%). 37% of residents, up from 32% in 2018, report it is likely that a foreign country will engage in vote tampering. More than three in ten (31%), a downtick from 37%, think their state election officials will try to discourage some people from voting during this year’s elections. 29% think it is likely their own vote will not actually be counted. One in five (20%) think it is likely that the information provided by the people working at their polling place will not be correct.

Partisan differences are also present on the questions of voter fraud and voters being deemed ineligible. Republicans (74%) are more likely than independents (55%) and Democrats (28%) to perceive voter fraud to be a possibility. Democrats (63%) and independents (38%) are more likely than Republicans (23%) to think people who show up to vote will be told they are ineligible at their polling place.

Gender and racial differences exist on the questions pertaining to whether or not all votes will be counted. Women (35%) and non-white residents (39%) are more likely than men (22%) and white residents (23%) to say it is likely their own vote will not be counted. Half of women (50%) and a majority of non-white residents (54%) think it is possible that, in general, many votes may not be counted. Only 38% of men and 39% of white residents say the same.

While many Americans say they do not experience difficulties while voting, there has been a notable increase in the proportion of residents who say they have had to wait on long lines at their voting place, 31% up from 20% in September 2018. 68%, though, report they hardly ever or never have to wait on long lines.

94% of Americans say they have hardly ever or never had voting machines break or not enough ballots at their polling place. A similar 93% say they hardly ever or never experience problems with their voter registration or identification, and 89% say it is rare that they have difficulty getting to their polling place. 84% say it hardly ever or never happens that they have a hard time getting time off from work to vote or are confused about how to fill out their ballot (84%). While the proportions are small, the number of people experiencing difficulty should not be discounted.

Most Americans (88%), though, personally think voting is easy. This November, nearly six in ten residents (58%) say they plan to vote in person on Election Day as opposed to by mail or absentee ballot (23%) or at an early voting location (18%).

Complete January 22, 2020 NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist Poll Release of the United States

Complete January 22, 2020 NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist Poll of the United States (Tables of Adults and Registered Voters)

Marist Poll Methodology

Nature of the Sample

NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist Poll Results: Election Security


1/21: Election Security

NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist Poll Results & Analysis

After an intense period between the United States and Iran, 49% of Americans say they disapprove of how President Donald Trump is handling the issue. 42% approve, and 9% are unsure. Partisan allegiances are intact with Republicans strongly backing the president and Democrats largely in opposition. Among independents, 49% disapprove of the president’s actions, and 42% approve. Men (49%) are more likely than women (35%) to approve of how Trump is handling Iran. A majority of Americans under the age of 45 (51%) express dissatisfaction with the president’s actions. Older Americans divide. 47% approve, and 47% disapprove.

“Americans overall are not patting the president on the back over how he handled the crisis in Iran,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion. “Closer to home, impeachment is even more polarizing along party lines for the president. On both issues, the president’s base remains in his corner.”

On the issue of impeachment, the nation remains divided. 47% support the Senate removing the president from office, and 47% oppose such an action. In December, Americans were similarly divided. 46% supported removal, and 49% opposed it.

Again, Republicans and Democrats are in opposite corners. Independents divide. 45% support removing the president from office, and 47% oppose his ousting. Majorities of women (54%) and Americans under the age of 45 (52%) are in favor of convicting Trump on impeachment charges. Majorities of men (56%) and residents 45 or older (51%) are against the Senate removing the president from office.

President Trump’s job approval rating remains consistent. 41% of Americans, including 30% who strongly do so, approve of how the president is doing his job. 53% of Americans disapprove. This includes 41% who are strongly of this opinion. In December, 42% of Americans approved of how the president was doing his job, and 52% disapproved.

Complete January 16, 2020 NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist Poll Release of the United States

Complete January 16, 2020 NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist Poll of the United States (Tables of Adults and Registered Voters)

Marist Poll Methodology

Nature of the Sample

NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist Poll Results