WNBC/Telemundo 47/POLITICO/Marist Poll: NYC Issues

NYC Likely Dem Voters Want Mayor with Gov’t Experience… Say They Are Prepared for Ranked-Choice Voting… Weigh In on Safety and Education

Nearly two in three likely Democratic primary voters in New York City (64%) say they are more likely to support a candidate for mayor who has government experience rather than a candidate mainly with experience from outside the government (24%). As early voting begins for Democrats across the city for the mayoralty primary, seven in ten likely Democratic primary voters report they are either very prepared (34%) or prepared (36%) to use ranked-choice voting to select their party’s nominee.

Experience Wanted
Are you more likely to support a candidate for mayor who:
Source: WNBC/Telemundo 47/POLITICO/Marist Poll New York City Likely Democratic Primary Voters.Interviews conducted June 3 –June 9, 2021, n=876MOE +/-3.8% percentage points
  • Likely Democratic primary voters in the Bronx (34%) are more likely than those in other boroughs to support a government outsider for mayor.

  • Whites (78%) and Blacks (74%) are more likely than Latino (61%) likely Democratic primary voters to say they feel very prepared or prepared to vote in a ranked-choice primary.

  • 62% of likely New York City Democratic primary voters are following the campaign for mayor either very closely (23%) or closely (39%). Those in Manhattan (67%), Queens (66%), and Brooklyn (63%) are more engaged than those in the Bronx (47%). Although likely Democratic primary voters in Staten Island were interviewed for this survey and included in citywide results, the proportional size of the borough in the survey sample is too small to report separately.

In light of the surge of shootings and violent crime in New York City, 33% of likely New York City Democratic primary voters think moving resources away from police to fund programs that deal with mental health will have the biggest impact on reducing crime. Nearly six in ten think other measures would be the better approach.

On the issue of improving public education, 60% of likely Democratic primary voters say focusing on bettering the quality of education in lower performing schools will have the biggest impact.

“Likely Democratic primary voters are ready to rank their choices for their nominee for mayor,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist Poll. “Most voters feel prepared to rank their preferences and are closely following the contest. If turnout is low, the ranked-choice voting system is not the reason why.”

How to Reduce Crime

Thinking about the recent surge in shootings and violent crimes in New York City, which one of the following do you think will have the biggest impact on reducing crime:

Source: WNBC/Telemundo 47/POLITICO/Marist Poll New York City Likely Democratic Primary Voters. Interviews conducted June 3 – June 9, 2021, n=876 MOE +/- 3.8% percentage points.

 

How to Improve Education

Thinking about New York City schools, which one of the following do you think will have the biggest impact on improving public education:

Source: WNBC/Telemundo 47/POLITICO/Marist Poll New York City Likely Democratic Primary Voters. Interviews conducted June 3 – June 9, 2021, n=876 MOE +/- 3.8% percentage points.

Other Findings

Public Safety and Health in NYC

More than three in four likely New York City Democratic primary voters see a future for their family in New York City, including 39% who strongly agree that they are firmly planted in the city and an additional 37% who agree that their future lies within the city. 21% are fed up with city living.

Looking at likely Democratic primary voters’ impressions of safety in the Big Apple, three in ten (30%) strongly agree that they feel safe from crime in their neighborhood, and an additional 49% agree. Whites (39%) are more likely than Latinos (27%) and Blacks (26%) to strongly assert that their neighborhood is safe from crime.

More than six in ten likely Democratic primary voters say they feel safe from crime walking around New York City, including 21% who are strongly of this opinion and 44% who agree with this sentiment. Likely Democratic primary voters in Brooklyn (24%) and Manhattan (24%) are those most likely to strongly believe they can safely walk around their neighborhood. Those in Queens (15%) are the least likely to have this impression.

Though still a majority, fewer likely New York City Democratic primary voters feel safe from crime riding the subway. 16% strongly agree that they can ride the rails without concern, and 37% agree that the subways are safe to ride. 39% of likely Democratic primary voters do not think feel riding the subway is safe. Democrats in the Bronx and Queens feel the most vulnerable to crime in the subways.

Many likely Democratic primary voters citywide perceive a need to increase the number of uniformed police officers in the subways. This includes 39% who are strongly of this impression and 30% who agree with this statement.

While 50% of New York City likely Democratic primary voters say they do not travel to and from work, most of those who do report they feel safe traveling to and from their place of employment. This includes 36% who strongly agree and 43% who agree.

On the issue of the coronavirus, most New York City likely Democratic primary voters either strongly agree (29%) or agree (53%) that the coronavirus pandemic is under control in the city.

NYC’s Recovery

71% of Democrats who are likely to vote in the primary think New York City will be back on its feet within a year, and 27% say it will take longer.

Direction of NYC

New York City likely Democratic primary voters divide about the direction of the city. 44% say it is moving in the right direction, and 44% report it is moving in the wrong one. 12% are unsure.

Likely Democratic primary voters in Brooklyn (38%) are the least likely to think the city is moving in the right direction. With 17% of these voters saying they are unsure, they are also the most uncertain. 44% of likely Democratic voters in Brooklyn say the city is off track. Latinos (51%) are more likely than whites (40%) and Blacks (42%) to believe the city is moving in the right direction. 50% of whites say New York City is moving in the wrong one. 42% of Latinos and 39% of Blacks share this view. A notable 19% of Blacks are unsure.