12/8: Clinton Leads Trump and Cruz… Competitive against Bush, Rubio, and Carson

In the 2016 race for the White House, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, 52%, leads businessman Donald Trump, 41%, by double digits and is ahead of Texas Senator Ted Cruz by seven points, 51% for Clinton to 44% for Cruz.  However, the race tightens when Clinton is matched against former Florida Governor Jeb Bush, Florida Senator Marco Rubio, and retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson.  Clinton edges Bush by four points, Rubio by three points, and she is in a virtual tie with Carson.

Among Latino voters nationally, Clinton has a wide lead.  However, all of these Republicans, except Trump, are getting a greater proportion of Latino voters than either Romney or McCain did in their presidential bids against Obama.

Americans, 58%, including most Latinos, 64%, think the Democratic Party better represents the views of Latinos.

When it comes to impressions of the candidates, Clinton’s rating is upside down among Americans.  Yet, a majority of Latinos have a positive opinion of her, and a plurality thinks she is improving the image of the Democratic Party.

On the Republican side, Carson remains the candidate with the highest positive rating among Americans.  However, as Carson has become better known, his negatives have more than doubled.  Still, Carson and Rubio are the only candidates with higher positive than negative scores among both Americans and Latinos.  Trump has the highest negative rating among Americans, 55%, and Latinos, 67%.

In addition, Trump is considered by nearly six in ten Americans, including nearly two-thirds of Latinos, to be hurting the Republican Party.  Majorities of Americans and Latinos also consider Trump to be insulting and offensive and do not believe he is the type of leader the nation needs now.  Republicans disagree.  71% of registered Republicans believe Trump “tells it like it is.”  76% think he is the kind of leader the country needs although a majority of these voters think he should better censor how he says things.

What do voters value in a candidate?  Half of the national electorate, 50%, thinks it is more important that a candidate reflects their positions on the issues while 46% say it is more important that a candidate share their values.  Latino voters are slightly more likely to prefer a candidate who shares their values, 51%, than one who identifies with them on the issues, 47%.

Most voters, including nearly three in four Latinos, say it would not affect their vote if a presidential candidate chooses someone of Latino or Hispanic background to be their running mate.  There is less of a consensus about whether or not voters would be more or less likely to support a candidate who supports the rollback of President Barack Obama’s executive action on immigration.

When it comes to the issue driving the election, jobs and the economy still ranks first among both Americans and Latinos.  Of note, terrorism has jumped to the number two spot among Americans.  Latinos mention education and immigration as their next two important concerns.

Most Americans watched at least some of presidential debates.  A notable proportion of both Americans and Latinos say the debates changed their mind about whom they would support for president.

Complete December 8, 2015 MSNBC/Telemundo/Marist Poll of the United States

Poll points:

  • Clinton, 52%, leads Trump, 41%, by 11 points among registered voters nationally.  In the September MSNBC/Telemundo/Marist Poll, Clinton was ahead of Trump by 13 points.  Among Latino voters, Clinton’s lead over Trump is 69% to 27%.  In September, Clinton outdistanced Trump by 47 points among Latinos.
  • Clinton, 51%, also has the advantage over, Cruz, 44%.  Clinton’s lead against Cruz has narrowed slightly from 11 points three months ago.  Clinton, 61%, outpaces Cruz, 34%, among Latino voters.  Clinton previously led Cruz by 33 points among the Latino electorate.
  • Clinton, 49%, edges Bush, 45%, among the national electorate.  The two candidates’ support is identical to what it was in the last poll.  Among Latino voters, Clinton, 61%, has a 26 point lead against Bush, 35%.  She previously led Bush by 30 points.
  • Clinton, 48%, and Rubio, 45%, are competitive.  Earlier this fall, Clinton, 50%, edged Rubio, 44%.  Among Latino voters, Clinton, 57%, outdistances Rubio, 38%, by 19 points.  However, in September Clinton was ahead of Rubio by 30 points among Latinos.
  • Clinton, 48%, and Carson, 47%, are in a virtual tie among registered voters.  However, Clinton outpaces Carson by 26 points among Latino voters, 61% to 35%.
  • Looking at the generic ballot, the Democratic candidate, 45%, and the Republican candidate, 45%, have identical support.  Among Latino voters, the Democratic candidate, 56%, is the favorite, but 36% say they would support the Republican candidate.
  • With 89% of Democrats reporting they would support the Democratic candidate and 94% of Republicans saying they would back the Republican candidate, there is a clear partisan divide.  Among independent voters, 42% would vote for the GOP candidate while 39% would support the Democratic candidate.  A notable 18% of independents are undecided.
  • 58% of registered voters, including 64% of Latino voters, think the Democratic Party better represents the views of Latinos.  22% of the national electorate, including 24% of Latino voters, believe the Republican Party better reflects the opinions of Latinos.
  • A majority of Americans, 55%, including 56% of Latinos, believe there have been enough members of the Clinton and Bush families in the White House.  40% of adults and 37% of Latinos disagree.

 Candidates’ Images

How do Americans view the leading candidates for president?  Only Carson and Rubio have a higher positive rating than negative score among Americans.


Only 32% of Americans, including 43% of Latinos, think Hillary Clinton is helping the image of the Democratic Party.  A majority of Democrats, 56%, believe Clinton is having a positive impact on their party.

A majority of Americans, 58%, including 65% of Latinos, believe Donald Trump is hurting the Republican brand.  Republicans divide.  43% think he helps the image of the party, and 40% believe he hurts it.  Americans and Latinos, alike, have reservations about Trump.  A majority of Americans, 52%, including 65% of Latinos, consider Trump to be insulting and offensive.  In contrast, 43% of Americans, including 31% of Latinos, say Trump tells it like it is.  In September, Americans divided about Trump’s manner of speaking.  49% thought he was insulting while 45% valued his candor.

When it comes to whether or not Trump is the kind of leader the nation needs, a majority of Americans, 55%, and an even greater proportion of Latinos, 68%, do not think he is the kind of leader the country needs now.  Most Republicans, 76%, disagree including 24% who think he is right for the times and 52% who report he is the kind of leader the nation needs if he can rein in his rhetoric.

Deciding Factors                                                                                       

When deciding for whom to vote, 50% of registered voters nationally believe it is more important that a candidate is closest to them on the issues while 46% want someone who shares their values.  Among Latino voters, 51% prefer a candidate who reflects their values while 47% think it is more important that a candidate is closest to them on the issues.

Most voters nationally, 88%, including 74% of Latino voters, say it makes no difference to their vote if a presidential nominee chooses a vice presidential candidate who is of Latino or Hispanic background.  A notable 23% of Latinos, though, would be more inclined to vote for a candidate who chooses a Latino or Hispanic running mate.

There is less consensus about whether or not voters would be more likely to support a candidate who favors the rollback of President Barack Obama’s executive action on immigration.  36% of the national electorate would be more likely to cast their ballot for such a candidate.  26% would be less likely to do so, and 33% say a candidate’s position on the issue makes no difference to their vote.  The views of Latino voters closely reflect those of the overall electorate.  54% of Republicans would support a candidate with this position compared with only 22% of Democrats.

But, do Americans consider immigration to be a key component in deciding their vote?  Jobs and the economy, 28%, remains the leading campaign issue.  Terrorism, 15%, health care, 12%, education, 12%, foreign policy, 9%, immigration, 9%, and taxes, 5%, follow.  In September, jobs and the economy, 32%, topped the list.  Education, 15%, health care, 13%, and immigration, 11%, also received double-digits.  Of note, the proportion of Americans who cite terrorism as the leading campaign issue has more than doubled from 6% in September.

Among Latinos, the number one issue in deciding their voter is jobs and the economy, 25%.  19% mention education followed closely by 18% who say immigration.  Terrorism is a concern of 11%.  10% mention health care.  Seven percent cite foreign policy while 6% say taxes.  In September’s survey, 31% of Latinos considered jobs and the economy to be the leading issue in the presidential contest followed by immigration with 24%.

Debates Draw Large Audiences

More than three in four registered voters, 76%, including 77% of Latino voters, watched at least some of the televised Republican presidential debates.  When it comes to the Democratic debates, more than six in ten registered voters, 63%, including 66% of Latino voters have tuned in for, at least, some of them.

Do the debates matter?  Among registered voters who watched the debates, 61%, including 58% of Latino voters, say the debates have not changed their minds about the candidate they plan to support.  Notable proportions of both registered voters, 35%, and Latino voters, 37%, say they have switched their support as a result of tuning into the debates.

Americans Confident U.S. will Defeat ISIS… More than One-Third Concerned about Terror Attack

Nearly seven in ten Americans, including 72% of Latinos, think the United States and its allies will be able to defeat ISIS.  However, concern about another terror attack exists.  A plurality of Americans say they are more concerned they will be a victim of a terror attack than of gun violence or police brutality.

Poll points:

  • 69% of Americans and 72% of Latinos think the U.S. and its allies will be successful in defeating ISIS.  24% of residents overall, including 22% of Latinos, do not think the U.S. will be successful.
  • 36% of Americans are more worried that they or someone they know will be a victim of a terror attack than gun violence, 31%, or police brutality, 17%.  Among Latinos, 32% express concern over terrorism, 31% are worried about gun violence, and 24% are concerned about police brutality.  More African Americans are concerned about being a victim of police brutality, 41% than either gun violence, 29%, or a terror attack, 16%.

Marist Poll Methodology

Nature of the Sample and Complete Tables

9/21: American Opinion: The Papal Visit & U.S. Relations with Cuba

Pope Francis will arrive in the United States tomorrow, following his trip to Cuba.  So, what do Americans think of the Holy Father?  And, what are their attitudes toward the United States’ relationship with Cuba?

A majority of Americans, 51%, including nearly half of Latinos, 49%, have a positive opinion of Pope Francis.  But, the Pontiff is not viewed negatively by Americans.  Rather, notable proportions of residents, including Latinos, do not have an opinion one way or the other, or do not know enough about Pope Francis to weigh in.  During his visit, nearly half of Americans, including Latinos, would prefer Pope Francis speak about social issues and economic policy and not just about religion and faith.

Most American Catholics have a favorable impression of the Holy Father including more than eight in ten Catholics who practice their faith.  In fact, a majority of practicing Catholics believe Pope Francis has made them feel closer to their faith.

When it comes to the United States’ relationship with Cuba, more than six in ten Americans, approve of opening up diplomatic relations with the country.  This now includes more than two in three Latinos who share this view, an increase from a poll conducted earlier this year.  Many residents and Latinos, alike, also support lifting the U.S. embargo against Cuba to permit travel to the nation.  Latinos are more interested than Americans, as a whole, to want to personally travel to the country.

Complete September 21, 2015 MSNBC/Telemundo/Marist Poll of the United States

Poll Points:  Perceptions of Pope Francis

  • 51% of Americans, including 49% of Latinos, have a positive impression of Pope Francis.  Less than one in ten Americans, 9%, and Latinos, 7%, has a negative impression of the Holy Father.  More than one in five residents, 27%, including 28% of Latinos has neither a positive nor negative opinion of Pope Francis.
  • 68% of Catholic Latinos have a favorable view of the Holy Father, including 75% of Catholic Latinos who practice their faith.
  • 49% of Americans would like Pope Francis to address social and economic policy during his upcoming trip to the United States 36% say he should focus entirely on religion and faith.  The views of Latinos reflect those of the overall public.  48% of Latinos report Pope Francis should speak to social issues and economic policy while 38% say he should stick to religion and faith.
  • A majority of Catholics, 51%, want Pope Francis to address more than just religion and their faith.  Practicing Catholics divide.  47% would like the Pontiff to speak to broader issues, and 45% believe he should address only religion and faith.
  • 45% of American Catholics report Pope Francis has made them feel closer to their faith, including 53% of practicing Catholics.  Among Catholic Latinos, nearly half, 49%, say they have a stronger bond with their faith because of Pope Francis, including 57% of Catholic Latinos who practice their faith.

Poll Points:  Diplomatic Relations with Cuba

Marist Poll Methodology

Nature of the Sample and Complete Tables

 

9/14: Decision 2016: Clinton Leads GOP Rivals… Bush Most Competitive Against Clinton

In hypothetical general election tossups, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton leads her potential Republican rivals among registered voters nationally.  Clinton does best against businessman Donald Trump, leading him by 13 points.  Her closest competitor, former Florida Governor Jeb Bush, trails Clinton by just four points.  Among Latino voters, Clinton outpaces Trump by 47 points, Cruz by 33 points, and Rubio and Bush by 30 points.  President Barack Obama carried the Latino vote in 2012 over Republican nominee Mitt Romney by 44 points.

If Vice President Joe Biden enters the contest and wins the Democratic Party’s nomination, he would also lead his possible Republican rivals.  Biden does best against Trump, leading him by 18 points.  His closest competition comes from Rubio and Bush who he leads by 8 points.  Biden is the overwhelming favorite among Latino voters.  He leads Trump by 51 points, Cruz by 30 points, and Bush by 27 points.  He is ahead of Rubio by only 14 points.

When it comes to perceptions of the candidates, Latinos, 55%, are more likely than Americans, overall, 42%, to view Clinton positively.  Latinos are also more likely to think that Clinton is helping the image of the Democratic Party.  Senator Bernie Sanders from Vermont suffers from low name recognition.  And, much talk has centered around whether or not Vice President Joe Biden will enter the presidential contest.  If he does, Americans’ perceptions of Biden are more positive than negative.

On the Republican side, Donald Trump has the highest negatives, especially among Latinos.  Americans are not satisfied with Trump’s impact on the image of the GOP party, are not overjoyed with the candidate’s comments, and are not sold on the idea that Trump is the type of leader the nation needs now.

Ben Carson has the highest positive rating among the presidential GOP contenders.  With the exception of Jeb Bush, many of the other Republican candidates suffer from low name recognition, especially among Latinos.

When it comes to the issue most likely to impact Americans’ vote, jobs and economy are the determining factor for, both, the general population and Latinos.  However, Latinos are more likely to cite immigration.

“Although the general election is a long way off, whether or not the GOP can connect with Latino voters is an important part of the 2016 narrative,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion.  “Bush, Cruz, and Rubio narrow the GOP’s margin among these voters from 2012 when matched against either Clinton or Biden.  Trump, who is not well liked among many Latinos, widens it.”

Complete September 14, 2015 MSNBC/Telemundo/Marist Poll of the United States 

General Election Prospects

Poll points:

  • Clinton leads Trump, 53% to 40%, among registered voters nationally.  Among Latino voters, Clinton has 69% to 22% for Trump.
  • Clinton is ahead of Senator Ted Cruz of Texas, 52% to 41%, among registered voters.  Clinton leads Cruz, 62% to 29%, among the Latino electorate.
  • Against Senator Marco Rubio of Florida, Clinton’s lead narrows to 6 points nationally.  She receives the support of 50% of registered voters to 44% for Rubio.  Among Latino voters, Clinton has a 30 point lead against Rubio, 61% to 31%.
  • Bush is the most competitive Republican against Clinton.  Clinton edges Bush, 49% to 45%, among registered voters nationwide.  However, Clinton leads Bush by two-to-one, 60% to 30%, among the Latino electorate.
  • Biden has an even wider lead over Trump, 56% to 38%, among registered voters.  Biden is ahead of Trump by 51 points, 71% to 20%, among Latino voters.
  • Against Cruz, Biden has a 15 point advantage, 54% to 39%, among the national electorate.  Among Latino voters, Biden outpaces Cruz, 57% to 27%.
  • Biden has an eight point lead against Rubio, 50% to 42%.  Biden has only a 14 point lead against Rubio, 50% to 36%, among Latino voters.
  • Biden is also ahead of Bush by 8 points.  Biden garners the support of 50% of the national electorate compared with 42% for Bush.  Among Latino voters, Biden has a 27 point advantage, 57% to 30%, against Bush.

Perceptions of the Candidates

How do Americans and Latinos view the key players in the presidential contest?

Looking at the Democratic side, Latinos, 55%, are more likely than Americans, overall, 42%, to have a positive opinion of Hillary Clinton.  Latinos are also more likely than the general population to perceive Clinton as helping the image of the Democratic Party.

Bernie Sanders is not a household name for a notable proportion of Americans, 34%. This includes 52% of Latinos who do not offer an opinion about him.  And, when it comes to Joe Biden, he is viewed more positively than negatively.

Donald Trump has the highest negatives among Americans, 55%, and especially Latinos, 70%, of any of the public figures measured.  And, while Trump’s demeanor is not overwhelmingly viewed favorably by Americans, overall, Latinos are more likely to frown upon Trump’s impact on the Republican brand and his manner.  Latinos are also more inclined than Americans, overall, to say Trump is not the kind of leader the nation needs now.

With the exception of Jeb Bush, many of the other Republican candidates suffer from low name recognition, especially among Latinos.  However, Bush receives mixed reviews.  He generates neither overwhelmingly positive nor negative feelings among Americans or Latinos.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clinton and Biden are well received among voters who identify as Democrats nationwide.  Sanders is also favorably viewed by the party’s rank and file but is less well known to a national Democratic audience.

All of the Republican candidates for the presidential nomination measured in this survey have a higher positive than negative score among voters who consider themselves Republican.  Ben Carson has the highest positive rating among the presidential GOP contenders.  A majority of Republicans also have a positive impression of Rubio and Trump.  Trump and Bush have higher negatives than the other Republican candidates.  Scott Walker is the least well known of the field.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

42% of Americans describe Clinton as having a negative impact on the image of the Democratic PartyOnly 28% believe she is having a positive one.  In contrast, a plurality of Latinos, 47%, thinks she is helping the party’s brand while just 19% say she is hurting it.

A majority of Americans, 52%, including 65% of Latinos, reports Trump is hurting the image of the Republican Party28% of Americans and only 13% of Latinos believe the Republican Party is benefitting from his candidacy.  When it comes to Trump’s manner of speaking, Americans divide with 49% describing his comments as insulting and offensive and 45% saying he is telling it like it is.  However, Latinos, 70%, overwhelmingly consider Trump’s comments to be offensive and insulting with just 26% saying his comments are on target.  A majority of Americans, 53%, believe Trump is not the kind of leader the country needs now.  This includes 69% of Latinos who have this view.

Prioritizing the Issues

Americans, 32%, including 31% of Latinos, cite jobs and the economy as the most important issue in determining their vote.  Latinos, 24%, are more likely than Americans, 11%, overall, to place an emphasis on immigration as a central campaign issue.

  • Registered voters nationally, 35%, and an identical share of Latino voters, consider jobs and the economy to be the most important factor in determining their vote for president.  However, when looking at other key issues, immigration is of greater importance to Latino voters than American voters, overall.  Among registered voters nationally, education, 14%, and health care, 12%, follow.  Nine percent cite immigration while foreign policy, 7%, terrorism, 7%, and taxes, 6%, round out the list.  For Latino voters, nearly one in five, 18%, mentions immigration followed closely by education at 16%.

Ready for a Woman or a Latino President?

Most Americans and Latinos think that the nation will be ready for a Latino or a woman president, if not now, than in the future.

  • A majority of Americans, 56%, thinks the United States is ready for a Latino president, and an additional 29% believe the nation will be ready to embrace a Latino president in the future.  Interestingly, Latinos, 49%, are slightly less likely to believe the nation is ready for a Latino president.  Four in ten, 40%, however, do think the United States will embrace a Latino president in the future.
  • About seven in ten Americans, 69%, including 63% of Latinos, believe the country is ready for a woman president.  An additional 21% of U.S. residents and 27% of Latinos think that the nation will be ready for a woman president in the future, but not now.

Marist Poll Methodology

Nature of the Sample and Complete Tables

9/14: Issues 2016: Immigration Reform and Race Relations

Immigration reform and race relations continue to be hot-button issues in the headlines and for the 2016 presidential campaign.  When it comes to U.S. immigration policy, many Americans, including more than eight in ten Latinos, think that birthright should remain in place so that children born in this country receive U.S. citizenship, regardless of whether or not their parents are undocumented immigrants.  Americans divide about whether or not the term “anchor baby” is offensive.  And, a plurality of residents say undocumented immigrants should be deported which would eliminate the need for so-called “sanctuary cities.”  Not surprisingly, a majority of Latinos consider the description “anchor baby” to be insulting, and about two-thirds support maintaining “sanctuary cities.”

On the issue of police-community relations, nearly two-thirds of Americans say minorities are treated the same as anyone else.  However, one in four U.S. residents, including 31% of Latinos, believe authorities treat minorities more harshly.

What do Americans and Latinos think of the Black Lives Matter movement?  When compared with another movement in the United States, the Tea Party, more Americans view “Black Lives Matter” positively.  37% of Americans have a positive impression of “Black Lives Matter” compared with one in four Americans who says the Tea Party conjures up positive feelings for them.

Complete September 14, 2015 MSNBC/Telemundo/Marist Poll of the United States 

U.S. Immigration Policy

Poll points:

  • More than six in ten adults nationally, 62%, report birthright should be continued in the United States.  31% disagree and say the U.S. Constitution should be amended so that children of undocumented immigrants are not automatically granted citizenship.  Most Latinos, 83%, say birthright should be continued.
  • 48% of Americans deem the term “anchor baby” to be offensive while 44% say the phrase is an accurate description of a child born to a pregnant woman who illegally crosses the U.S.-Mexico border.  A majority of Latinos, 56%, believe the term is offensive.
  • 48% of residents nationally believe undocumented immigrants should be deported which would eliminate the need for “sanctuary cities.”  43%, though, think these cities are necessary to provide undocumented immigrants with services.  66% of Latinos report “sanctuary cities” should remain.

 

Police-Community Relations in the United States

Poll points:

  • 64% of Americans, including 58% of Latinos, say police in their communities treat minorities the same as anyone else.  25% of residents, including 31% of Latinos, think minorities are dealt with more forcefully.  Only 4% of Americans, including 6% of Latinos, report minorities are treated less harshly by authorities.
  • 37% of Americans, including 32% of Latinos, have a positive association with the Black Lives Matter movement.  25% of residents and 12% of Latinos have a negative association with it.  38% of Latinos are unfamiliar with “Black Lives Matter.”
  • 25% of Americans view the Tea Party positively.  19% of Latinos agree.  However, 36% of residents, overall, including 18% of Latinos, have a negative association with the Tea Party movement.  34% of Latinos are unaware of the Tea Party.

Marist Poll Methodology

Nature of the Sample and Complete Tables

5/4: Newfound Money: What Would You Do? Latino Americans Emphasize Home Ownership

May 4, 2015 by  
Filed under Family Finances, Featured, Money, Money Vault

If given $100,000 to spend or invest, with no strings attached, saving for long-term expenses such as retirement or college, 25%, buying a home or paying off a mortgage, 24%, and paying down their debt, 22%, top the list of ways Americans would spend or invest their newfound funds.  Among Latinos, buying a home or paying a mortgage, 32%, is the top way they would invest their newly acquired cash.  Saving for long-term expenses, paying off debt, and starting a business, follow.

When it comes to cell phone usage, American and Latino cell phone owners, alike,  use a smartphone.  Among Americans, the iPhone, 35%, edges android phones, 31%.  Latinos, however, are slightly more likely to use androids, 34%, than the iPhone, 29%.

Only 30% of American smartphone owners, including 26% of Latinos, use their phone mostly to talk.  Most employ their smartphone for other purposes.  20% of smartphone owners, overall, report they use their phone primarily to text.  14% use it mostly to connect via social media, 12% send email, and 11% surf the Internet.

While smartphone use among Latinos reflects Americans’ habits, overall, Latinos are more likely than Americans to use their smartphone mostly to listen to music, 14%, and are less likely to use it primarily to send email, 7%.

Complete May 4, 2015 MSNBC/Telemundo/Marist Poll of the United States

Poll points:

  • If given $100,000 to spend or invest,  Americans would save for long-term expenses like retirement or college, 25%, buy a home or pay off their mortgage, 24%, or pay off their debt, 22%.  11% of residents would invest in the stock market while 10% would start a business.  Five percent would use the money toward non-necessities like vacations, entertainment, and gifts.
  • A plurality of Latinos, 32%, cites buying a home or paying down a mortgage.  21% would save for long-term expenses while 19% would pay off debt.  16% of Latinos would start a business including 26% of Latino men.  Eight percent would invest in the stock market, and 3% would use the funds on non-necessities.
  • 74% of American cell phone owners, including 76% Latinos, use a smartphone.
  • Among Americans, the iPhone, 35%, and android phones, 31%, are the leading smartphones.  The Blackberry, 1%, and a Windows phone, 1%, are little used.  Six percent have a smartphone but are unsure which kind, and 25% of U.S. cell phone owners say they do not have a smartphone.
  • 34% ofLatino cell phone users have an android phone while 29% own an iPhone.  Only 1% owns a Blackberry, and the same proportion, 1%, has a Windows phone.  11% have a smartphone but are unsure what type it is, and 24% of Latino cell phone owners do not have a smartphone.
  • Just three in ten American smartphone owners, including 26% of Latinos, say the primary use of their phone is to talk.  20% of smartphone owners, overall, say they mostly text with their phone, and 14% turn to social media on their smartphones. Email is the key function for 12% while 11% surf the Internet.  Other activities include listening to music, 6%, playing games, 3%, taking and sending pictures, 1%, and watching videos, 1%.

Marist Poll Methodology

Nature of the Sample and Complete Tables

4/9: Many Americans, Including Most Latinos, Consider Immigration Reform a Priority… Pathway to Citizenship Key Component for Majority of Americans, But Latinos Divide

Immigration reform is important to many Americans, especially Latino residents.  Nearly two-thirds of Americans, 65%, including 81% of Latinos, think immigration legislation which provides a pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants should be addressed by President Barack Obama and Congress.  In fact, 41% of Americans and 59% of Latinos believe the issue should be an absolute priority for this year’s Congress.

Of note, Latino residents who are U.S. immigrants, 74%, are more likely than those born in the United States, 46%, to consider immigration reform to be an immediate concern.

On the question of providing a pathway to citizenship for veterans of the armed forces, Americans and Latinos have similar views.  55% of residents, overall, and 61% of Latinos say providing citizenship to veterans should be an immediate priority for President Obama and Congress this year.

Americans, overall, are more concerned about the inclusion of the pathway to citizenship in immigration reform than Latinos.  Among Latinos, there is slightly greater urgency to pass immigration legislation, even if it does not contain the pathway to citizenship.  While 52% of Americans assert reform should only be passed if it includes this measure, 39% say reform should occur even if the measure is not included.  Latino residents divide with 49% thinking it is more important that a bill be passed only if it includes a pathway to citizenship while 44% report it is more important to pass immigration reform even if it does not provide a way for undocumented immigrants to gain citizenship.

Latinos born in the United States, 52%, emphasize the pathway to citizenship while Latino adults born in another country divide on the issue.

When it comes to President Barack Obama’s use of executive action to implement changes to immigration, opposition rests on procedure not policy.  Nearly six in ten Americans, including more than three in four Latinos, approve of the president’s order.  Among those who disapprove, 56% of Americans and 58% of Latinos oppose the executive action because the president did not seek congressional approval, not because they are against the content of the policy.

If Congress does not pass immigration reform by the end of its current term, Republicans will face the most blame.

Complete April 9, 2015 MSNBC/Telemundo/Marist Poll of the United States

Poll points:

Diplomatic Recognition of Cuba Supported by Majorities of Americans and Latinos

The opinions of Latinos closely reflect those of the overall population when it comes to U.S. foreign policy toward Cuba.

Poll points:

Economic Sanctions against Venezuela Considered Appropriate by Half of Americans

50% of Americans, including a slim majority of the Latino population, consider the economic sanctions placed on government officials in Venezuela for acts of violence and the prohibition of freedom of expression of protestors to be the right form of censure.  Latinos, 19%, are slightly more likely than Americans, overall, to say the punishment is too strong.

Poll points:

  • 50% of the U.S. adult population, including 52% of Latinos, think the economic sanctions levied against Venezuela are the appropriate punishment for acts of violence endorsed by the nation’s leaders and prohibiting freedom of expression among protesters.
  • 19% of Latinos, compared with 13% of the general population, say the sanctions are too severe.  20% of U.S. residents, including 16% of Latinos, believe the sanctions are not strong enough.

Equal Treatment under the Law?

Americans, 65%, are more likely than Latinos, 54%, to believe police in their local community treat minorities the same as anyone else.  Latinos, especially those under 45, are more likely to report minorities are treated more harshly.

  • 35% of Latinos, compared with 27% of the overall population, report minorities are treated more harshly by their local police.  Only 4% of U.S. residents, including 5% of Latinos, believe minorities are treated less harshly.
  • Latinos under 45 years old, 39%, are more likely than older Latinos, 28%, to say minorities are treated more harshly than anyone else. 

The Impact of Pope Francis on the Views of the Catholic Church

37% of Americans say Pope Francis has improved their opinion of the Catholic Church, and 29% report he has made little difference in their opinion.  The views of Latinos are similar to those of the overall population. 

  • A plurality of Americans, 37%, including 32% of Latinos, reports Pope Francis has given them a more favorable view of the Catholic Church.  Only 6% of Americans, including 7% of Latinos, say the Pope has lessened their view of the Church.  29% of Americans, similar to 32% of Latinos, think the Pontiff has made little difference in their views.  29% of residents, including 28% of Latinos, don’t know enough about the Pope to comment.

Football Takes Top Spot as Americans’ Favorite Sport… Shares Honors with Soccer among Latinos

Football, 42%, is Americans’ favorite pastime.  Among Latinos, football, 31%, and soccer, 28%, vie for the title of top sport.

  • 42% of Americans consider football their favorite sport.  Baseball, 15%, is a distant second followed by basketball, 14%.  11% choose soccer while 5% like hockey.  Three percent cite another sport, and 4% do not have a favorite sport.
  • Football, 31%, and soccer, 28%, are cited as the top sports by Latinos.  Baseball, 15%, and basketball, 14%, trail behind.  Only 2% of Latinos are hockey fans, and 3% mention another sport as their favorite.  Two percent do not have a favorite sport.

Marist Poll Methodology

Nature of the Sample and Complete Tables