11/23: Helmet-to-Helmet Hits: Football Fans Define the Penalty

November 23, 2010 by  
Filed under Featured, Football, Sports, Sports Bench

The NFL has been cracking down on players who commit illegal helmet-to-helmet hits with fines and suspensions.  But, what do football fans think the punishment should be for this type of player conduct?  More than one-fifth — 27% — believe these players should be, both, fined and suspended.  An additional 31% say they should be only fined while 22% believe they should just be suspended.  One-fifth — 20% — believe neither punishment should be used.

©istockphoto.com/mstahlphoto

©istockphoto.com/mstahlphoto

Younger football fans are more tolerant of helmet-to-helmet hits. 27% of those younger than 30 years old don’t think any punishment should be imposed compared with 14% of fans 60 and older.

There is also a gender gap on this question. More men — 26% — compared with women — 11% — don’t think players should be penalized at all for these hard hits.

As for the number of U.S. residents who are professional football fans, 68% of residents report they watch the sport, at least, a little. There has been no change on this question since Marist’s October survey.

Table: Punishment for Helmet-to-Helmet Hits
Table: Professional Football Fans

Marist Poll Methodology

Related Story:
Interview: Verne Lundquist Discusses Hard Hits on the Gridiron

10/1: Majority of U.S. Residents College Football Fans … Nearly Half Watch NFL & College Ball

October 1, 2010 by  
Filed under Featured, Football, Sports, Sports Bench

54% of U.S. residents are college football fans.  This includes 12% who watch college football a great deal, 10% who enjoy a good amount of it, and 32% who say they follow it a little.  46% do not watch college football at all.

©istockphoto.com/dehooks

©istockphoto.com/dehooks

Men, residents who earn $50,000 or more annually, and those in the Midwest, West, and South are those who are most likely to be college football fans.

Americans, however, are more inclined to be professional football fans than college football fans.  More than two-thirds of U.S. residents — 68% — tune into the NFL at least a little bit.  This includes 20% who watch the sport a great deal, 16% who follow it a good amount, and 32% who catch it a little.  32% do not watch it all.

Although there is little difference among geographic regions, men and Americans younger than 45 years old are more likely to be professional football fans.

Is there an overlap in the proportion of U.S. residents who watch both professional football and college football?  Yes.  Nearly half of Americans — 49% — watch both NFL and college football.  The proportion who watches just professional football outnumbers those who tune into just college football.  Nearly one in five — 19% — check out only the pros tossing the pigskin around while only 5% follow just college teams.  More than one in four residents — 27% — do not watch either professional or college football.

Table: College Football Fans
Table: Professional Football Fans
Table: NFL vs. College Football Watchers

Marist Poll Methodology

4/6: Will Baseball Attendance Slide?

April 6, 2009 by  
Filed under Baseball, Featured, Sports, Sports Bench

A majority of baseball fans don’t think they’re getting their money’s worth given ticket prices at major league ballparks and admit they pay very little attention to the national pastime.

©istockphoto.com/SondraP

©istockphoto.com/SondraP

Last season, 78% of the country didn’t attend a single game, and even 61% of those who consider themselves true baseball fans didn’t make it to see the boys of summer either. With the current economic recession, that’s as much of a concern for the owners as winning the pennant.

Ticket Value Table
Table:  Do You Follow Baseball?
Baseball Attendance Table

Marist Poll Methodology

Related Stories:

4/6: Steroid Scandal: Fans and Public React
4/6: Fans and Public Agree: Character More Important Than Talent
Bucks and Baseball: An Interview

4/6: Fans & Public Agree: Character More Important Than Talent

April 6, 2009 by  
Filed under Baseball, Featured, Sports, Sports Bench

Baseball fans and the general public both value a ballplayer’s character more than his talent.  63% of the public say character matters most.  64% of the public who are baseball fans agree.  However 31% of the fans say talent is more important compared to 24% of the general public.

And, when it comes to being role models, 48% of the general public think baseball players teach kids mostly good things on and off the field.  A greater percentage of those who call themselves fans (56%) believe players are good role models.

Table – Baseball Players:  Talent vs. Character
Table – Players as Role Models

Marist Poll Methodology

Related Stories:

4/6: Will Baseball Attendance Slide?
4/6: Steroid Scandal: Fans and Public React
Baseball’s Steroid Scandal: An Interview
Baseball, Steroids, Players, and Pollsters