4/19: Baseball Fans Support Adding Protective Netting in MLB Stadiums

April 19, 2016 by  
Filed under Baseball, Featured, Sports, Sports Bench

A majority of American baseball fans think Major League Baseball teams should be required to add protective netting to ballparks in areas close to the field in order to prevent fans from being hit by foul balls and bats.  When it comes to personal preference about whether they would choose to sit behind such netting, a majority of baseball fans report they would rather sit in an unprotected section.  However, fans are more likely to say they want to sit behind protective netting when sitting in seats close to the field or attending a game with children.

54% of baseball fans, including 51% of those who have attended a Major League Baseball game, support adding protective netting to areas close to the field.  Gender, age, and racial differences exist.  While 60% of women support such protective measures, men divide 48% in favor to 49% opposed.  Also of note, fans 45 years of age or older, 60%, are more likely than younger fans, 46%, to say netting should be installed.

On the question of fan preference, 54% of baseball fans say they would prefer to sit in a section of the ballpark without protective netting.  Again, demographic differences exist.  While 55% of women report they would rather sit in seats with the netting, only 29% of men say the same.  Fans 60 and older, 54%, are more likely than younger fans to choose a seat shielded from foul balls and bats.  Those 18 to 29 years old, 32%, and fans 30 to 44 years of age, 31%, are the least likely to have this preference.

When proximity to the field enters the picture, opinions change.  If sitting above the dugout or along the baselines, half of baseball fans, 50%, say they would prefer to sit in an area protected by netting compared with 47% who would not.  However, a gender gap remains.  61% of women, compared with 41% of men, would opt to sit in the protected seats.

Children are a game changer.  77% of baseball fans would choose to sit in an area with netting if they were with children.  Regardless of demographic group, at least 69% report they would like to be protected from foul balls and bats if bringing a child to the ballpark.

This HBO Real Sports/Marist Poll has been conducted in conjunction with the Marist College Center for Sports Communication.

“Public awareness exists about fan safety at Major League baseball games, especially when it comes to children.  This should allow the League to cautiously put up additional safety netting,” says Keith Strudler, Director of the Marist College Center for Sports Communication, “The challenge for baseball is to institute safety measures without upsetting fans who would rather have an unobstructed view.”

Does watching a game through protective netting make the game less enjoyable?  66% report it does not change the way they feel about watching the game.  One in four, 25%, believes it makes it less enjoyable, and 8% report it makes it more enjoyable.  Men, 30%, are more likely than women, 20%, to think protective netting interferes with their enjoyment of the game.

Half of Americans, 50%, say they follow baseball, at least, a little.  81% of fans have been to a major league stadium.  19% have not.

Baseball, however, is not the game of choice for sports fans.  A majority of sports fans, 55%, say football is their favorite sport to watch or follow.  Baseball is a distant second with 17% followed by basketball with 14%.  Seven percent choose soccer, and 6% select hockey.

58% of Americans are sports fans, little changed from 57% in December.

Click Here for Complete April 19, 2016 USA HBO Real Sports/Marist Poll Release and Tables

Marist Poll Methodology

Nature of the Sample 

 

4/21: More Than One-Third Believes Decline in African American Baseball Players is a Concern… Race Factors into Perceptions of Baseball

More than one in three Americans considers the decline in African American players in Major League Baseball to be a problem.  This includes about one in eight who thinks the decline to be a major issue.

African Americans, 49%, are more likely than whites, 34%, to consider the composition of MLB players to be troublesome.

Looking at Americans’ perceptions of baseball, only about one in seven thinks of it as the most popular sport for children to play.  Football, 35%, and soccer, 28%, exceed baseball.  Racial differences exist.  White Americans, 15%, are more than twice as likely as African Americans, 6%, to say baseball is the leading sport in which children participate.  Still, baseball places third among whites, in terms of popularity, and fourth among African Americans.

Why aren’t children playing baseball?  Finances are a factor.  More than six in ten Americans, 63%, say the cost of playing in top travel leagues is, at least, part of the reason.  Additionally, 47% say the equipment is too expensive, and that is, at least, a partial explanation.

Americans wax nostalgic about the sport.  Nearly two-thirds of Americans, including a majority of African Americans played baseball as a child.  And, baseball, 33%, also ranks first as the sport Americans would like to play with their son.  However, while the sport tops the list for white Americans, it comes in fourth among African Americans.

Americans view baseball positively.  Most, 83%, consider it a sport which is rich in tradition and not too old-fashioned.  Nearly three in four Americans, 74%, call baseball “cool” as opposed to “not cool.”  And, nearly six in ten, 59%, say the sport is changing with the times and is not stuck in the past.  However, residents divide about baseball’s level of excitement.

Despite Americans’ mostly favorable impressions of the sport, baseball isn’t a major topic around the watercooler.  Only 31% say people talk about or follow the sport a lot during baseball season.  African Americans are the least likely to keep up with the sport.

This HBO Real Sports/Marist Poll has been conducted in conjunction with the Marist College Center for Sports Communication

Click Here for Complete April 21, 2015 USA HBO Real Sports/Marist Poll Release and Tables

“These results help explain what we all suspect — that baseball lags behind other sporting pastimes for American youth, particularly for African-Americans,” says Keith Strudler, Director of the Marist College Center for Sports Communication. “What could be most problematic for baseball officials is that changing the nature of the game may not alter this trend, since the larger impediment is cost, something that will be more difficult to drastically change.”

Poll points:

  • 35% of Americans, including 12% who say it is a major problem, think the decline in the number of African American and black, non-Latino Major League Baseball players is troublesome.  65% believe it is not a problem at all.
  • Age matters.  Americans under 45, 41%, think the proportion of African American and black baseball players is a problem.  31% of those who are older agree.
  • 49% of African Americans compared with 34% of whites report the decline is a problem.

Few Americans Think Baseball is Popular Sport among Children

  • 15% of Americans consider baseball to be the most popular team sport for children to play followed closely by basketball, 14%.  Football, 35%, and soccer, 28%, surpass baseball on the list.
  • Racial differences exist.  Among whites, 37%, and Latinos, 34%, football is the sport most children play.  Soccer comes in second among whites, 32%, and Latinos, 31%.  Among African Americans, 41% say children in their community play basketball, and 33% cite football.
  • A plurality of men, 39%, considers football to be the most popular sport played by children.  Among women, 32% choose football, and a similar proportion, 30%, select soccer.
  • Cost factors into perceptions of why some children do not play baseball.  More than six in ten residents, 63%, think, at least, part of the reason is because it costs too much to play in top travel leagues.  Close to one in five, 18%, say it is the main reason.  37% report it is not a reason at all.
  • While a majority of Americans, 53%, reports the cost of equipment is not a factor at all, 47% think children are not stepping up to the plate, partially, because of the expenseA majority of non-white parents, 55%, reports the cost of baseball equipment has, at least, something to do with why some children don’t play the sport, while a majority of white parents, 45%, says it’s not a reason at all.
  • There is a perception by 40% of residents that, at least in part, children are not taking up America’s pastime because too many children are needed to play the game.  60% say it is no reason at all.
  • 40% believe the length of the game has something to do with why children don’t gravitate toward the game of baseball.   Nearly half of African Americans, 47%, say the same.
  • About one-third of residents, 33%, thinks baseball takes too much skill, and that factors into why some children do not play the game.    
  • 32% of Americans believe lack of a nearby ball field is, at least, part of the reason children are not playing baseball.  68% report it is no reason at all.  African Americans, 47%, are more likely than Latinos, 36%, and whites, 28%, to think not having a place nearby to play is a reason children don’t play baseball.  In fact, close to one in five African American residents, 18%, thinks this is the main reason.
  • 31% say not knowing the rules is, at least, part of the reason why some children do not play baseball.  69% report this is not a reason at all.  41% of African Americans, including one in ten who report it is the main reason, attribute not understanding the game as a factor in why some children do not play the sport.
  • 31% of adults nationally believe, at least, part of the reason some children don’t play baseball is because the sport is not fun.

Baseball Considered Top Father-Son Sport

  • 33% of Americans report baseball is the sport they would like to most play with their son.  Basketball is a distant second, 21%.  19% choose soccer, and 18% pick football.
  • Again, race enters into the equation.  39% of white Americans would like to take their son to the baseball field while a plurality of African Americans, 34%, would visit a football field with their son.  Among Latinos, baseball, 26%, basketball, 25%, and soccer, 25%, receive comparable interest.
  • Americans 45 and older, 40%, are more likely than younger residents, 25%, to pick baseball as the sport they would share with their child.  Among those under 45, there is little consensus.
  • Close to two-thirds of adults nationally, 64%, say they played baseball as a child.  This includes 68% of white Americans, 60% of Latinos, and 57% of African Americans.
  • Nearly six in ten Americans, 57%, say they are baseball fans.

Baseball Mostly Conjures Positive Associations, But…

  • Most Americans, 83%, consider baseball a sport rich in tradition, and only 14% say it is too old-fashioned.
  • African Americans, 30%, non-white parents, 28%, and those under 30 years old, 22%, are most likely to refer to baseball as too old-fashioned.
  • Baseball is also considered “cool” by 74% of Americans.  22% think it is not.
  • Nearly six in ten residents, 59%, think baseball is changing with the times while 33% believe it is stuck in the past.
  • 59% report baseball is a sport children play in the city.  35% disagree.  African Americans divide.  49% think it is not a game played in the city.  47% say it is.
  • Americans are torn about baseball’s excitement level.  50% consider baseball “exciting.”  47% say it is “boring.”
  • Only 31% of residents say baseball is a large part of what people talk about or follow during Major League Baseball’s season.  An additional 42% report the subject is sometimes part of the conversation.  Close to one in four, 23%, says baseball is not part of the watercooler discussion.
  • African Americans, 35%, and non-white parents, 32%, are most likely to say baseball is not followed or discussed during the season.

Marist Poll Methodology

Marist Poll Nature of the Sample and Complete Tables

 

4/9: Many Americans, Including Most Latinos, Consider Immigration Reform a Priority… Pathway to Citizenship Key Component for Majority of Americans, But Latinos Divide

Immigration reform is important to many Americans, especially Latino residents.  Nearly two-thirds of Americans, 65%, including 81% of Latinos, think immigration legislation which provides a pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants should be addressed by President Barack Obama and Congress.  In fact, 41% of Americans and 59% of Latinos believe the issue should be an absolute priority for this year’s Congress.

Of note, Latino residents who are U.S. immigrants, 74%, are more likely than those born in the United States, 46%, to consider immigration reform to be an immediate concern.

On the question of providing a pathway to citizenship for veterans of the armed forces, Americans and Latinos have similar views.  55% of residents, overall, and 61% of Latinos say providing citizenship to veterans should be an immediate priority for President Obama and Congress this year.

Americans, overall, are more concerned about the inclusion of the pathway to citizenship in immigration reform than Latinos.  Among Latinos, there is slightly greater urgency to pass immigration legislation, even if it does not contain the pathway to citizenship.  While 52% of Americans assert reform should only be passed if it includes this measure, 39% say reform should occur even if the measure is not included.  Latino residents divide with 49% thinking it is more important that a bill be passed only if it includes a pathway to citizenship while 44% report it is more important to pass immigration reform even if it does not provide a way for undocumented immigrants to gain citizenship.

Latinos born in the United States, 52%, emphasize the pathway to citizenship while Latino adults born in another country divide on the issue.

When it comes to President Barack Obama’s use of executive action to implement changes to immigration, opposition rests on procedure not policy.  Nearly six in ten Americans, including more than three in four Latinos, approve of the president’s order.  Among those who disapprove, 56% of Americans and 58% of Latinos oppose the executive action because the president did not seek congressional approval, not because they are against the content of the policy.

If Congress does not pass immigration reform by the end of its current term, Republicans will face the most blame.

Complete April 9, 2015 MSNBC/Telemundo/Marist Poll of the United States

Poll points:

Diplomatic Recognition of Cuba Supported by Majorities of Americans and Latinos

The opinions of Latinos closely reflect those of the overall population when it comes to U.S. foreign policy toward Cuba.

Poll points:

Economic Sanctions against Venezuela Considered Appropriate by Half of Americans

50% of Americans, including a slim majority of the Latino population, consider the economic sanctions placed on government officials in Venezuela for acts of violence and the prohibition of freedom of expression of protestors to be the right form of censure.  Latinos, 19%, are slightly more likely than Americans, overall, to say the punishment is too strong.

Poll points:

  • 50% of the U.S. adult population, including 52% of Latinos, think the economic sanctions levied against Venezuela are the appropriate punishment for acts of violence endorsed by the nation’s leaders and prohibiting freedom of expression among protesters.
  • 19% of Latinos, compared with 13% of the general population, say the sanctions are too severe.  20% of U.S. residents, including 16% of Latinos, believe the sanctions are not strong enough.

Equal Treatment under the Law?

Americans, 65%, are more likely than Latinos, 54%, to believe police in their local community treat minorities the same as anyone else.  Latinos, especially those under 45, are more likely to report minorities are treated more harshly.

  • 35% of Latinos, compared with 27% of the overall population, report minorities are treated more harshly by their local police.  Only 4% of U.S. residents, including 5% of Latinos, believe minorities are treated less harshly.
  • Latinos under 45 years old, 39%, are more likely than older Latinos, 28%, to say minorities are treated more harshly than anyone else. 

The Impact of Pope Francis on the Views of the Catholic Church

37% of Americans say Pope Francis has improved their opinion of the Catholic Church, and 29% report he has made little difference in their opinion.  The views of Latinos are similar to those of the overall population. 

  • A plurality of Americans, 37%, including 32% of Latinos, reports Pope Francis has given them a more favorable view of the Catholic Church.  Only 6% of Americans, including 7% of Latinos, say the Pope has lessened their view of the Church.  29% of Americans, similar to 32% of Latinos, think the Pontiff has made little difference in their views.  29% of residents, including 28% of Latinos, don’t know enough about the Pope to comment.

Football Takes Top Spot as Americans’ Favorite Sport… Shares Honors with Soccer among Latinos

Football, 42%, is Americans’ favorite pastime.  Among Latinos, football, 31%, and soccer, 28%, vie for the title of top sport.

  • 42% of Americans consider football their favorite sport.  Baseball, 15%, is a distant second followed by basketball, 14%.  11% choose soccer while 5% like hockey.  Three percent cite another sport, and 4% do not have a favorite sport.
  • Football, 31%, and soccer, 28%, are cited as the top sports by Latinos.  Baseball, 15%, and basketball, 14%, trail behind.  Only 2% of Latinos are hockey fans, and 3% mention another sport as their favorite.  Two percent do not have a favorite sport.

Marist Poll Methodology

Nature of the Sample and Complete Tables

3/24: Injured Top College Athletes Should Not Carry the Costs, Says Majority… Americans Divide over College Degrees in Sports

March 24, 2015 by  
Filed under Featured, Special Events, Sports, Sports Bench

Americans favor change on a major issue relating to NCAA student-athletes.

Providing health insurance to injured, top college athletes after they graduate receives the support of majorities of Americans, 56%, and college sports fans, 55%, alike.

Currently, as detailed in Bernie Goldberg’s report in this month’s Real Sports one-hour NCAA special, the NCAA does not require colleges to provide such insurance for their athletes, except in the most extreme circumstances.

Americans’ opinions divide over whether or not college athletes should be permitted to major in and receive degrees in their sport.

Another much debated question is whether or not top college basketball and football players should be paid.  Nearly two-thirds of Americans, 65%, do not think they should receive monetary compensation for their time and efforts.  However, about one-third of Americans think they should be on the payroll, a slight increase from 29% just last year.  Americans under thirty and African Americans are much more supportive of this idea.

Sexual assault on college campuses has been a topic which has drawn recent national attention by, both, politicians and the media.  But, when college athletes are involved in such incidents do Americans think they are judged by a different standard?  Nearly six in ten residents, 58%, think they are treated differently, including 36% who believe they are given greater slack and 22% who say they are held to a tougher standard.

A plurality of Americans, 46%, though, do not think college athletes are more likely to either commit or be accused of sexual assault than non-athletes.  In fact, only 15% believe they are more likely than their college age counterparts to be involved in such incidents.

Again, on many of these questions, opinion differs by age and race.

This HBO Real Sports/Marist Poll has been conducted in conjunction with the Marist College Center for Sports Communication 

Click Here for Complete March 24, 2015 USA HBO Real Sports/Marist Poll Release and Tables

“The public’s view on post-collegiate health insurance and the ability to even major in sports recognizes that top college athletes are making real sacrifices of time and even physical wellness,” says Dr. Keith Strudler, Director of The Marist College Center for Sports Communication. “It also suggests the public largely sees value in college sports as an academic enterprise. That’s a contrast to the common stereotype of the privileged college athlete.” 

Poll points:

  • 56% of Americans, including 21% who strongly have this view, support providing health insurance to college athletes after they graduate for long-term medical problems that are a result of injuries they received while playing college sports.  40%, including 12% who firmly have this position, oppose such benefits.  Similar proportions of college sports fans have these views.
  • Younger Americans are more likely than older residents to support health insurance for college athletes after graduation.  75% of Americans under 30, compared with 47% of those 60 and older share this view.
  • Race also comes into play.  Nearly half of African Americans, 49%, strongly support such a proposal compared with 27% of Latinos and just 15% of white residents.
  • Americans, and college sports fans alike, divide about whether or not college athletes should be allowed to major in and receive a degree in the sport they play.  49% of Americans favor such a program while 45% oppose it.
  • Demographic differences exist.  African Americans, 69%, residents under 30 years old, 60%, Midwesterners, 57%, and residents without college degrees, 55%, are among those who offer the most support for majors in college sports.
  • 65% of Americans do not think student athletes in top men’s football and basketball programs should be paid.  33% believe they should be.  There has been a slight increase in the proportion of those who say these athletes should be paid.  When HBO Real Sports/Marist reported this question last March, 29% of residents supported such compensation.
  • While majorities of those in all generations oppose paying college athletes, residents under 30, 41%, are the most likely to favor it.  This is an increase from 34% in March 2014.
  • 59% of African Americans favor paying college athletes.  42% of Latinos and 26% of whites share this view.  There has been a shift among Latinos.  Last year, 27% supported monetary compensation for top college athletes.
  • Nearly six in ten Americans, 58%, think college athletes who commit sexual assault are not treated the same as non-college athletes.  This includes 22% who say they are treated more harshly and 36% who report they are treated less harshly.  Only 33% think they receive the same treatment.  Of note, 42% of Americans age 45 to 59 think college athletes accused of sexual assault face less severe penalties than those who do not play a sport.
  • While pluralities of African Americans, 43%, and Latinos, 39%, assert that college athletes and non-athletes who commit sexual assault are on level ground, 40% of whites say athletes are dealt with less harshly.  A notable 32% of African Americans say they are treated more harshly.
  • 46% of Americans say top college athletes are no more likely to commit or be accused of sexual assault than non-athletes.  A notable 32%, however, report that sports players are more likely to be accused of sexual crimes, and 15% think they are more likely to commit them.

Marist Poll Methodology

Marist Poll Nature of the Sample and Complete Tables

5/14: PED Suspensions Warranted, Say Nearly Seven in Ten

May 14, 2014 by  
Filed under Baseball, Featured, Sports, Sports Bench

 Major League Baseball is in full swing, but has last season’s player suspensions for using performance-enhancing drugs rubbed fans the wrong way?  68% of baseball fans nationally think the MLB has taken the right steps.  In fact, one in five — 20% — believes the league hasn’t gone far enough.  Only 8% say their actions have gone too far.  Four percent are unsure.

Click Here for Complete May 14, 2014 USA Marist Poll Release and Tables

Table: Has Major League Baseball Taken the Right Steps in Handling Players’ Use of Performance-Enhancing Drugs?

More Fans Expected to Head to the Ballpark 

While half of baseball fans — 50% — say they did not attend any MLB games last year and don’t plan to do so this season either, there has been an increase in the proportion of fans who think they will go to more games this year.  Nearly one in five — 19% — expects to go to more baseball games this season.  27% say they will attend about the same amount of games they did last year, and only 4% plan to go to fewer.

When Marist last reported this question in March 2013, 54% of fans said they wouldn’t be making a trip to the stadium.  13% reported they would be attending more games than in the past year while 28% said they would be attending about the same number of baseball games.  Six percent, at that time, believed they would be making fewer outings to the ballpark.

Key points:

  • Fans younger than 45 are the key.  32% of fans in this age group think they will be attending more baseball games this season.  This is up from 19% last year.  Among those 45 or older, 12% expect to make more trips to the stadium this year compared with 9% previously.
  • While fans who earn $50,000 or more annually — 22% — are slightly more likely than those who make less — 17% — to increase their ballgame attendance, there has been a bump in the proportion of fans in both income groups who expect to do so.  Last year, 15% of fans who earn $50,000 or more said they would be going to more games.  12% who made less said the same.

Although nearly half of fans — 49% — do not think the cost of a ticket to a major league game is a good value for the money, 41% believe it is a good bang for their buck.  10% are unsure.  These findings suggest more fans find value in going to a game this season than last spring.  At that time, 52% of fans said the price of a ticket was not a good value.  37% thought it was, and 11% were unsure.

How many Americans are baseball fans?  45% of residents follow professional baseball a great deal — 9%, a good amount — 8%, or a little — 28%.  However, a majority — 55% — does not watch baseball at all.

Table: More or Less Games than Last Year

Table: Ticket Prices Value

Table: Baseball Fans

How the Survey was Conducted

Nature of the Sample

 

7/23: More Than Six in Ten Fans Believe Connection to Biogenesis Steroid Clinic Too Little to Justify MLB Suspensions

July 23, 2013 by  
Filed under Baseball, Featured, Sports, Sports Bench

An investigation by Major League Baseball is underway to determine whether or not to suspend players associated with the Miami-based clinic, Biogenesis, that provided performance enhancing drugs to other players.  But, a majority of baseball fans nationally do not think that an association with the clinic is enough to warrant disciplinary action.  61% of fans say it is not right for the MLB to suspend players who did not test positive for performance-enhancing drugs but are connected to the Biogenesis clinic.  28% think it is right for the players to be suspended, and 11% are unsure.

Click Here for Complete July 23, 2013 USA Marist Poll Release and Tables

“Sports fans are very loyal to their favorite athletes, and for most, it would take true hard evidence to change their perceptions of these athletes,” says Dr. Keith Strudler, Director of The Marist College Center for Sports Communication.  “Circumstantial evidence, no matter how strong, probably isn’t going to convince most fans.”

The poll was conducted prior to the suspension of Milwaukee Brewers’ Ryan Braun yesterday.  At this point, few fans know a lot about the scandal.  Just 24% say they have heard either a great deal — 13% — or a good amount — 11% — about MLB players and the Biogenesis clinic.  26%, have heard a little and 50% know nothing at all about it.

This Marist Poll has been done in conjunction with The Marist College Center for Sports Communication.

Table: Right or Not Right for MLB to Suspend Players Connected to Miami Clinic?

Table: Awareness of MLB Players and Biogenesis Clinic

The Great Hall of Fame Steroid Debate

More than three in four baseball fans — 78% — think players who have used steroids or other performance-enhancing drugs should not be eligible for the Hall of Fame.  18% think these players should be, and 4% are unsure.

“When it’s proven that an athlete cheated, most sports fans aren’t just upset, they often feel betrayed,” says Dr. Keith Strudler, Director of The Marist College Center for Sports Communication.  “They seem to show unusual disdain towards their former heroes, refusing them the ultimate reward of entering the Hall of Fame.”

Time has not healed all wounds.  When Marist last reported this question in April 2009, 70% of baseball fans thought players who used steroids should not be admitted to the Hall of Fame.  24% believed they should be given this honor, and 6%, at the time, were unsure.

There are age differences.  Fans under 45 years old are more forgiving than those who are older.  24% of younger fans think steroid use should not keep players from the Hall of Fame.  13% of those 45 and older share this view.

Table: Steroid Use and the Hall of Fame

How the Survey was Conducted

Nature of the Sample

About Keith Strudler, Ph.D.

Keith Strudler, Ph.D., is the director for the Marist College Center for Sports Communication.  Dr. Strudler founded Marist’s popular concentration in sports communication in 2002, now one of the nation’s largest in the discipline.  He studies and teaches in the areas of sports media, sports and society, and sports reporting and information.  Dr. Strudler also writes weekly sports commentary for WAMC, an NPR radio station in Albany, NY.

3/27: A Day at the Ballpark? MLB Games a No-Go for a Majority of Fans

March 27, 2013 by  
Filed under Baseball, Featured, Sports, Sports Bench

Major League Baseball’s Opening Day is almost here, but baseball fans nationally may not be flocking to the field.  According to this Marist Poll, 54% of fans did not attend any games last year and do not plan to attend any games this year.  28% say they will venture out to the ballpark about the same amount as they did last year while 13% believe they will attend more games than last season.  Six percent report they will go to fewer games than last season.

Click Here for Complete March 27, 2013 USA Marist Poll Release and Tables

Little has changed on this question since last year.  At that time, 53% of baseball fans said they were not planning to attend to any MLB games nor did they attend any games the season before.  31% reported they would go to the same amount of games as they had previously while one in ten — 10% — thought they would go to more baseball games.  Six percent believed they would attend fewer games.

Of note regionally, on the heels of the San Francisco Giants’ World Series victory and off-season acquisitions by other Pacific Coast teams, a majority of baseball fans in the West — 53% — plan to attend at least the same number of games they did last year.  Included here, are 20% who say they will take more trips to the ballpark and 33% who think their attendance will be about the same as last season.

Ticket prices could play a role.  52% of fans nationally do not think the cost of an MLB ticket is a good value for the money.  37% believe the experience is a good value for the price, and 11% are unsure.  Last year, 56% of fans did not think they got a good bang for their ticket buck while 34% reported admission prices were a good value.  10% were unsure.

While fans in the Northeast remain the most dissatisfied with ticket prices, fewer have this opinion.  More than six in ten baseball fans in this region — 63% — do not think the price of an MLB ticket is a good value.  This compares with 73% who had this view last year.  In the Midwest, a majority of fans — 55% — say the experience is not worth the cost of a ticket.  47% of fans in the South and 45% of those in the West share this view.  Last year, 55% of Midwest fans, 52% of those in the South, and 47% of fans in the West did not think the ticket price for a Major League Baseball game was a good value for the money.

But, there is some good news for America’s pastime, there has been a bump in the proportion of baseball fans nationwide.  56% of adults watch professional baseball, at least, a little.  This includes 9% who watch a great deal of the sport, 10% who follow a good amount of it, and 37% who watch a little baseball.  45% do not watch any of the game.  When Marist last reported this question, half of adults — 50% — reported they were baseball fans.

Table: More or Less Games than Last Year

Table: Ticket Prices Value

Table: Baseball Fans

How the Survey was Conducted

Nature of the Sample

 

3/15: On the Field at Spring Training

March 15, 2013 by  
Filed under Featured, John Sparks

What is the latest from the Cactus League?

The Marist Poll’s John Sparks is at Spring Training in Scottsdale, Arizona.  Find out the latest details in Sparks’ discussion with Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion, below.

3/13: The Latest from Spring Training

March 13, 2013 by  
Filed under Featured, John Sparks

What does Major League Baseball’s American League West look like this year?  What are the chances of the Los Angeles Angels, and what are the odds they will face-off against the Dodgers in the World Series?

The Marist Poll’s John Sparks is in Peoria, Arizona with the latest.  View his discussion with Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion, below.

3/11: The Marist Poll Goes to Spring Training

March 11, 2013 by  
Filed under Featured, John Sparks

Major League Baseball’s Opening Day is still a few weeks away, journalists and sports fans alike flock to Spring Training games.  Among them is Senior Editor for the Marist Poll website, John Sparks!

What’s the latest from the field in Surprise, Arizona?  MIPO’s Director Lee M. Miringoff spoke with Sparks via Skype about today’s sights and sounds.  Check out the video below!

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