2/15: 2016 Wide Open GOP Field in Early Caucus and Primary States… Clinton Solid Front-Runner on Democratic Side

February 15, 2015 by  
Filed under Featured, National, National Poll Archive, Politics

Taking an early look at the key presidential caucus and primary states of Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina, a Republican front-runner fails to emerge.  In Iowa, former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee, former Florida Governor Jeb Bush, and Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker vie for the top spot among the state’s potential Republican electorate.

In New Hampshire, Bush, Walker, Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky, and New Jersey Governor Chris Christie each receives double-digit support.  Turning to South Carolina, the state’s favorite son, Senator Lindsey Graham, battles Bush, Walker, Huckabee, and retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson for the lead.

The picture is much clearer on the Democratic side.  Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is the odds-on favorite for her party’s nomination.  Clinton outpaces her closest Democratic competitors by very wide margins in Iowa, New Hampshire, and South Carolina.

However, in hypothetical general election matchups, despite edging her GOP rivals in Iowa and New Hampshire, Clinton falls short of 50% in each of the three states polled.  In South Carolina, when paired against Bush or Walker, Clinton garners about what President Obama received in 2012 against Mitt Romney.

“Top tier?  The morning line for these critical states points to a rough and tumble Republican nomination battle.  Seven of the 11 potential GOP candidates has double-digit support in, at least, one of the states, but no one breaks 20% anywhere,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion.  “Not so for the Democrats where Hillary Clinton has a commanding lead.”

 

Complete February 15, 2015 NBC News/Marist Poll Release of Iowa, New Hampshire, and South Carolina

Complete February 15, 2015 NBC News/Marist Poll Tables of Iowa

Complete February 15, 2015 NBC News/Marist Poll Tables of New Hampshire

Complete February 15, 2015 NBC News/Marist Poll Tables of South Carolina

 

Republicans and Democrats Satisfied with Candidates

Poll points:

Clinton Ahead in Iowa and New Hampshire, Not in South Carolina

Poll Points:

  • Among registered voters in Iowa, Clinton, 48%, is ahead of Bush, 40%.  Clinton, 49%, also outpaces Walker, 38%, statewide.
  • In New Hampshire, Clinton, 48%, edges Bush, 42%.  Against Walker, Clinton has 49% to 42% for Walker.
  • Bush, receives 48%, and Clinton, 45%, in South Carolina.  Clinton garners 46%, and Walker receives 46% when matched in the state.

Voters on the Issues

In Iowa, New Hampshire, and South Carolina, more than six in ten voters in each state find a candidate who favors raising taxes on the wealthy to be acceptable.  This is especially true in Iowa, where 73% of voters have this view.  Majorities of voters in all three states also find a candidate who supports repealing the federal health care law, who backs immigration reform, or who promotes action to combat climate change to be preferable.  A candidate who supports Common Core education or favors increased military action against ISIS is also deemed satisfactory to majorities of voters in Iowa, New Hampshire, and South Carolina.

However, registered voters are less likely to find a candidate who opposes same-sex marriage to be acceptable.

On many of these questions, there is a notable divide between the potential Republican and Democratic electorates.

Poll points:

 

Job Creation and Economic Growth Key Issue

Residents in Iowa, New Hampshire, and South Carolina consider job creation to be the most important issue in the 2016 election.  Jobs and the economy is also the most pressing concern for the potential Democratic and Republican electorates with the exception of Iowa where the deficit and government spending is the top priority for the potential Republican electorate for 2016.

Poll points:

  • 30% of adults in Iowa consider job creation and economic growth to be the most important issue in the 2016 presidential election.  Deficit and government spending, 21%, military action against ISIS, 17%, and health care, 15%, follow.  11% cite income equality while looking out for the interests of women is the priority for 3% of Iowa residents.
  • Among Iowa’s potential Republican electorate, the deficit and government spending, 32%, tops the list followed by military action against ISIS, 25%, and jobs, 23%.  The potential Democratic electorate prioritizes jobs, 32%, followed by health care, 20%, and income equality, 19%.
  • There is little consensus about Iowans’ second most pressing issue.  Similar proportions of adults mention job creation, 24%, health care, 22%, and the deficit and government spending, 20%.  15% put military action against ISIS at the top of their list while 12% cite income equality.  Six percent select looking out for the interests of women.
  • Job creation and economic growth, 33%, is the most important issue to New Hampshire adults.  The deficit and government spending, 19%, health care, 18%, and military action against ISIS, 14% follow.  11% place income equality at the top of their priority list while only 2% think looking out for the interests of women to be the most important issue in the upcoming election.
  • When looking at New Hampshire’s potential Republican electorate, jobs, 33%, rank number one.  The deficit and government spending with 28% and military action against ISIS at 20% follow.  Among the potential Democratic electorate, jobs, 34%, is tops followed by health care and income equality, each at 21%.
  • When it comes to the second choice issue for New Hampshire adults, job creation and economic growth, 22%, and health care, 22%, top the list.  Military action against ISIS, 20%, and the deficit and government spending, 18%, are close behind.  Income equality, 9%, and looking out for the interests of women, 7%, round out the list.
  • 32% of South Carolina adults think the key issue in the 2016 election is job creation and economic growth.  Health care, 20%, military action against ISIS, 18%, and the deficit and government spending, 15%, also rate highly.  Eight percent believe income equality is the most crucial topic of discussion while women’s interests receive 3%.
  • South Carolina’s potential Republican electorate points to jobs, 29%, as the top priority for 2016.  The issues of military action against ISIS with 28% and the deficit and government spending at 24% are also seen as important.  For South Carolina’s potential Democratic electorate, jobs, 35%, is crucial followed by health care, 28%, and income equality, 15%.
  • Looking at the second most important issue for South Carolina adults, 25% choose job creation and economic growth.  23% select health care and 22% pick the deficit and government spending.  14% mention military action against ISIS, and 8% cite income equality.  Seven percent think looking out for the interests of women should be the priority.

U.S. Senate Race in New Hampshire Competitive

Looking at the 2016 election for U.S. Senate in New Hampshire, Democratic Governor Maggie Hassan and incumbent Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte are closely matched. 

Poll points:

  • 48% of New Hampshire registered voters support Hassan in the race for U.S. Senate while Ayotte garners 44%.  Seven percent are undecided.

Approval Rating Roundup

In Iowa, New Hampshire, and South Carolina, President Barack Obama’s job performance rating is upside down.  The governors in each state are rated highly.

Poll points:

Marist Poll Methodology for Iowa

Nature of the Sample and Complete Tables for Iowa

Marist Poll Methodology for New Hampshire

Nature of the Sample and Complete Tables for New Hampshire

Marist Poll Methodology for South Carolina

Nature of the Sample and Complete Tables for South Carolina

 

2/12: Obama’s Request for Military Action against ISIS Receives Majority Support…Many Americans Say Boots on the Ground are Needed

February 12, 2015 by  
Filed under Featured, National, National Poll Archive, Politics

In a poll conducted just hours after President Barack Obama made the case for congressional authorization to use military force against ISIS, a majority of Americans tells the NBC News/Marist Poll they support their congressperson voting for the use of U.S. military action against the Islamic militants.  However, residents divide about whether or not President Obama’s proposal will receive bipartisan support.  With nearly seven in ten residents saying they are aware of the president’s request, the news of possible military action against ISIS has permeated Americans’ consciousness.

While the president is requesting limited use of U.S. ground troops, where do Americans stand?  About two-thirds say at least some presence of ground forces are needed.  In fact, about one in four Americans thinks a large number of boots on the ground is necessary.  Not surprisingly, partisan differences exist.

Despite many Americans’ belief that the U.S and its allies will be victorious in defeating ISIS, confidence in President Obama’s strategy to combat ISIS is mixed.

When it comes to President Obama’s legacy, Americans divide about whether the president will be remembered more for ending a war or for starting a new one.

“This challenge will bear on the president’s legacy,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion.  “By nearly two to one, Democrats think President Obama will still be remembered for ending a war, but by more than three to one, Republicans see the president’s legacy as having started a new one.”

Complete February 12, 2015 NBC News/Marist Poll of the United States

Poll points:

  • 54% of Americans want their member of Congress to vote to authorize U.S. military action against ISIS.  32% are against such approval, and more than one in ten, 13%, is unsure.  A majority of Democrats, Republicans, and Independents think their congressional representative should support the president’s request.
  • Residents divide about whether President Obama’s proposal will have bipartisan support in Congress.  44% think it will not, and 40% believe it will.  16% are unsure.  A majority of Democrats, 56%, and a plurality of Republicans, 44%, say the president’s plan will not receive bipartisan support.  A notable 20% of Republicans are unsure.    Independents divide.  44% think partisanship will be put aside while 43% believe it will be front and center in the debate.
  • About two-thirds of Americans, 66%, think U.S. boots on the ground are necessary, to some degree, to combat ISIS.  This includes 26% who support sending a large number of U.S. ground forces and 40% who back deploying a limited number of troops on the ground.  26% do not want any ground forces involved, and 7% are unsure.
  • Views about the use of ground troops differ based on party.  38% of Republicans, compared with 16% of Democrats and 25% of independents, support sending a large number of ground forces.
  • Many Americans, 66%, are optimistic that the U.S. and its allies will defeat ISIS.  There is little partisan difference of opinion on this question.
  • Looking at Americans’ level of confidence in President Obama’s strategy to combat ISIS, there is a divide.  48% do not have very much faith in the president’s approach.  45% express confidence in the president’s proposal.  Not surprisingly, 82% of Republicans have little or no confidence in the president’s military strategy.  Most Democrats, 71%, are confident in the president’s approach.  Independents are more divided:  44% express confidence and 49% do not.
  • When it comes to President Obama’s legacy, 44% of Americans say President Obama will be remembered more for starting a new war than ending one.  40% think the opposite will be true.  A notable, 16%, are unsure.  More than six in ten Republicans, 62%, and a majority of independents, 51%, believe President Obama’s legacy will be defined by beginning a new war.  59% of Democrats think he will be remembered for ending a war.
  • 69% of Americans have heard about the president’s request to use U.S. military force against ISIS, and 31% have not.

Marist Poll Methodology

Marist Poll Nature of the Sample

12/17: GOP in the Driver’s Seat, but Voters Not Convinced It’s for the Better

Many registered voters nationally think the GOP will have more influence in directing the nation in 2015 than President Barack Obama.  However, only 35% think this will bring about change for the better.

Congressional Republicans take control of the legislature amid continued dissatisfaction with elected officials in Washington and pessimism about the overall direction of the country.  In fact, the job approval rating of the Democrats in Congress is at its lowest point, 27%, and the approval rating of congressional Republicans stands at 28%.  President Obama doesn’t fare much better.  His approval rating is at 43% among registered voters, and his favorable rating is upside down.  On the specifics of Mr. Obama’s job performance, fewer voters think well of how he is handling foreign policy than previously, and he receives a lukewarm rating on his approach to the economy.

More than six in ten voters say the new Republican-controlled Congress should amend, if not repeal, the 2010 health care law. About one-third think the GOP should focus on other items on the national agenda.

Americans are not overly optimistic about the future of their family’s finances.

“The balance in power has changed in Washington,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion.  “But, voters need to see results to reverse their sense of dysfunction in government.”

Complete December 17, 2014 McClatchy-Marist Poll of the United States

Poll points:

  • Regardless of party, more than six in ten voters, 61%, think the Republicans in Congress will have more influence over the direction of the nation in 2015.  29% believe President Obama will be the driving force, and 2% report neither will be in command.
  • When it comes to who voters want to have more influence, 48% prefer the GOP to take the lead while 42% want Obama in charge.  Looking at party, while 93% of Republicans want the GOP to have the most impact,  82% of Democrats look to President Obama to take the lead.  47% of independents turn to the GOP for leadership, and 40% put their stock in President Obama.
  • While 35% of voters think the Republican-controlled Congress will effect change for the better, a plurality, 40%, doesn’t expect to see any impact at all.  One in five, 20%, reports GOP control will be change for the worse.
  • Seven in ten voters, 70%, think it is better for government officials to compromise to find solutions than stand on principle.  Democrats, 82%, are more likely than Republicans, 59%, to choose to compromise.  More than one-third of Republicans, 36%, value principle over compromise compared with 15% of Democrats who have this view.
  • Close to two-thirds of Americans, 64%, are pessimistic about the direction of the country.  31% say the nation is on track, and 6% are unsure.  Earlier this fall, 61% of residents said the country was going in the wrong direction, and 35% reported it was moving in the right one (Trend).
  • The job approval rating of congressional Democrats is at its lowest point, 27%, since McClatchy-Marist began reporting this question. The previous low for Democrats was 28% and occurred in November of 2011 (Trend).  In October, 33% of voters approved of how the Democrats were doing their job.
  • The job approval rating of the Republicans in Congress, 28%, also falls short in voters’ eyes.  In October, 24% of registered voters approved of how the congressional GOP was doing its job (Trend).
  • 43% of registered voters nationally approve of the job President Obama is doing in office while 52% disapprove.  Obama’s approval rating stood at 46% in October (Trend)Mr. Obama’s favorable rating is also upside down.  44% have a favorable impression of him while a majority, 54%, does not.  Voters divided on the president’s image, 48% to 49%, respectively, earlier this fall (Trend).
  • 38% of the national electorate, down from 46% in October, approve of how the president is handling foreign policy.  52% disapprove, and 10% are unsure (Trend).
  • On his handling of the economy, 41% of voters approve of how the president is tackling the issue.  This is unchanged from 41% in McClatchy-Marist’s previous survey.  55% currently disapprove of how President Obama is dealing with the economy (Trend).
  • More than six in ten registered voters nationally, 61%, want the Republicans in Congress to make changes to the 2010 health care law.  This includes 23% who want the law repealed and 38% who favor modifications to the legislation.  34%, though, say the GOP should focus their efforts on other issues.  While 53% of Democrats want the GOP to focus on other issues, and 48% of Republicans want to eliminate the law, 38% of Democrats and 35% of Republicans want changes to be made to the law.  A plurality of independents, 43%, would like the health care law modified.
  • 51% of Americans expect their personal family finances to stay about the same in the coming year.  32% think they will see an improvement, and 17% believe their family’s financial situation will get worse.  In October, 54% reported their money matters would be status quo, 30% thought they would get better, and 17% believed they would get worse (Trend).

Marist Poll Methodology

Nature of the Sample and Complete Tables

12/16: McClatchy-Marist Poll

Do voters nationally expect the Republican-controlled Congress to have a positive impact on the country?  Find out in the latest national McClatchy-Marist Poll.

To read the full McClatchy article, click here.

12/16: Standard-Bearers Party Favorites for 2016

December 16, 2014 by  
Filed under Featured, National, National Poll Archive, Politics

Two familiar Republican faces, former presidential nominee Mitt Romney and former Florida Governor Jeb Bush, lead the crowded field of potential candidates for the GOP nomination in 2016.  Looking at what Republicans and Republican leaning independents want in a nominee, close to two thirds prefer a candidate who stands on conservative principles rather than a nominee who can win.  However, there has been a slight shift in opinion toward selecting a nominee with a viable chance of winning the White House.

On the Democratic side, there has been a major change in what the Democrats want in their presidential nominee.  Close to six in ten Democrats and Democratic leaning independents prefer a candidate who will move the nation in a new direction and not someone who will continue the policies of President Barack Obama.  One year ago, Democrats divided between charting a new course and continuing the current Democratic agenda.

What does this mean for former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton?  If she were to seek the Presidency, Clinton is the odds-on favorite to win her party’s nomination.  In several hypothetical matchups, Clinton also leads her potential Republican opponents by double digits.

But, could a third party candidate be a spoiler?  Looking at a generic ballot which includes an independent choice, neither a Democrat nor a Republican has the edge.  Close to one in five says they would support an independent candidate.

“Open seats often are a political free-for-all, and this one could very well end up that way,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion. “But, right now, Clinton is in the driver’s seat both for her party’s nomination and the general election.”

Complete December 16, 2014 McClatchy-Marist Poll of the United States

Poll points:

  • If he decided to run in the 2016 Republican primary, former GOP nominee Mitt Romney would be the choice of 19% of Republicans and Republican leaning independents to represent his party.  Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush receives 14% of the vote.  New Jersey Governor Chris Christie and former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee each has the support of 9% while retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson garners 8%.  Five percent are for Kentucky Senator Rand Paul.  Senator Ted Cruz of Texas and Texas Governor Rick Perry each garners 4% while Representative Paul Ryan from Wisconsin, former Senator Rick Santorum of Pennsylvania, Senator Marco Rubio of Florida, and Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker each receives 3%.  Ohio Governor John Kasich has the support of 2% while Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal and former business executive Carly Fiorina each has the backing of 1%.  More than one in ten, 13%, is undecided.
  • Without Romney in the primary, Bush takes over the lead with 16% of Republicans and Republican leaning independents followed by Huckabee with 12% and Christie with 10%.  Carson receives 8%, Ryan garners 7%, and Paul has 6%.  Cruz and Perry each has the support of 5% followed by Rubio, Walker, Kasich, and Santorum with 3% each.  One percent is for Jindal, and the same proportion, 1%, supports Fiorina.  Nearly one in five, 18%, is undecided.
  • By nearly two to one, Republicans and Republican leaning independents, 64%, report it is more important to have a nominee who will stand on conservative principles than it is to have a nominee for president who can win.  Last December, 67% thought the priority was to have a nominee who stood on conservative principles (Trend).
  • Hillary Clinton is the overwhelming favorite in the Democratic primary.  62% of Democrats and Democratic leaning independents support the former Secretary of State.  Vice President Joe Biden is a distant second with 11% while Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts has 9%.  Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont receives 4%.  Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley has 1% as does former Senator Jim Webb of Virginia.  11% are undecided.
  • Nearly six in ten Democrats and Democratic leaning independents, 58%, think it’s more important to have a nominee who will move the nation in a new direction while 38% want someone who will continue President Barack Obama’s policies.  This is a major shift since last December when Democrats divided.  46% said they wanted a candidate who would go in a new direction, and 49% reported they wanted a continuation of Obama’s policies (Trend).

Clinton Bests GOP Rivals by Double Digits

Poll points:

  • Clinton, 53%, has a 12 point lead against Romney, 41%, among registered voters nationally.  Six percent are undecided.  Clinton, 53%, outpaced Romney, 44%, by 9 points in February (Trend).
  • Twelve points also separate Clinton, 53%, from Christie, 41%.  Six percent are undecided.  Clinton, 51%, outdistanced Christie, 42%, by 9 points in October (Trend).
  • Clinton, 53%, is up by 13 points over Bush, 40%.  Seven percent are undecided.  In October, Clinton, 53%, was ahead of Bush, 42%, by 11 points (Trend).
  • Clinton has the support of 54% of voters to 40% for Paul.  Six percent are undecided.  Clinton, 52%, had a 9 point lead over Paul, 43%, earlier in the fall (Trend).
  • Looking at a generic ballot which includes a choice for an independent candidate, neither the Democratic candidate, 37%, nor the Republican candidate, 35%, has the advantage among registered voters.  17% of voters would support an independent candidate.  12% are undecided.

Marist Poll Methodology

Nature of the Sample and Complete Tables

12/15: McClatchy-Marist Poll

In the 2016 race for the White House, has a Republican emerged  as the front-runner in the crowded GOP field?  Find out in the latest national McClatchy-Marist Poll.

The White HouseTo read the full McClatchy article, click here.

12/15: Ferguson and Beyond: Race Permeates Views of Law Enforcement

December 15, 2014 by  
Filed under Featured, National, National Poll Archive, Politics

Following the grand jury decision in Ferguson, Missouri not to indict a white police officer who killed Michael Brown, the discussion, now, turns to whether or not the federal government should bring civil rights charges against that police officer.  Americans’ views on the issue fall along a racial divide.

Three in four African Americans nationally believe a federal civil rights suit should be brought against the officer while more than two-thirds of whites disagree.  When it comes to protests following incidents such as the fatal shooting in Ferguson, nearly seven in ten whites say these actions bring negative attention to the debate about race’s role in law enforcement.  A plurality of African Americans, however, believes these protests shed positive light on the issue.

African Americans and whites do agree in one area.  Regardless of race, more than six in ten Americans believe Michael Brown’s stepfather should not be charged with inciting a riot based on his reaction to the grand jury decision.

On the broader issue of the law enforcement process, race drives the discussion.  While whites are more likely to describe incidents like those in Ferguson and Staten Island, New York as isolated occurrences, African Americans are more likely to say these events are indicative of a larger problem.  Whites are more than twice as likely as African Americans to have a great deal of confidence in their community police to gain the trust of local residents and to treat blacks and whites equally.  The proportion of whites who express a high level of confidence in local law enforcement to protect them from violent crime also outnumbers the proportion of African Americans who share this view.

“When it comes to reactions to the events in Ferguson and Staten Island, the racial divide is wide,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion.

Complete December 15, 2014 McClatchy-Marist Poll of the United States  

Poll points:

  • 57% of Americans do not think the federal government should bring civil rights charges against the white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri who killed an unarmed man.  34% believe the officer should face charges, and 9% are unsure.  African Americans, 75%, are much more likely than whites, 23%, to report a civil rights suit should be filed.  50% of Latinos think civil rights action against the officer should be taken.
  • More than six in ten residents, 62%, think the protests following the Ferguson and Staten Island decisions bring negative attention to these issues.  21% believe they have a positive impact while 12% say they have no effect at all.  While 68% of whites and 59% of Latinos believe the protests bring negative attention to the issues, only 35% of African Americans agree.  A plurality of African Americans, 43%, think the protests shed a positive light on the matter.
  • Many residents, 64%, say Michael Brown’s stepfather should not be charged with inciting a riot in the aftermath of the grand jury’s decision not to indict the officer who killed Brown.  29% report he should face charges.  78% of African Americans do not think the actions of Brown’s stepfather warrant criminal action.  64% of whites and 60% of Latinos agree.
  • 53% of Americans think the grand jury decisions in Ferguson and Staten Island are isolated cases and do not reflect an overall problem with the justice system when it comes to race and police officers.  41% of residents say these decisions are part of a larger issue.  76% of African Americans, compared with 33% of whites, report there is a problem with the justice system when it comes to law enforcement and race.  56% of Latinos share this view.
  • 43% of Americans have a great amount of confidence in their local police to gain the trust of local residents.  31% have a fair amount of confidence in law enforcement to do so, and 12% have some degree of confidence in them.  13% have very little confidence in the police to gain the trust of members of their community.  50% of whites have a great deal of confidence in the police to gain the trust of those they serve compared with only 22% of African Americans.
  • When it comes to the confidence Americans have in their local police to treat blacks and whites equally, 41% have a great deal of confidence in them.  30% have a fair amount of trust in local law enforcement to do so, and 11% have some.  16% of residents have very little confidence in local police to promote racial equality.  Whites, 49%, are more than twice as likely as African Americans, 22%, to think blacks and whites are treated equally by the police.
  • A plurality of U.S. residents, 45%, have confidence in their local police to protect them from violent crime in their community.  33% have a fair amount of trust in them to do so while 9% have some confidence in them.  12% of Americans have very little trust in law enforcement to keep them safe.  Nearly half of white residents, 49%, compared with 30% of African Americans, have a great deal of confidence in their local police to keep them safe from violent crime.  36% of Latinos have a similar level of trust in police to protect them.
  • Registered voters divide over President Barack Obama’s handling of race relations.  47% disapprove, and 44% approve.  Looking at race, 54% of white voters disapprove while 57% of non-white voters approve.
  • A plurality of Americans, 43%, thinks it helps race relations that President Obama is African American.  33% say it hurts, and a notable 24% are unsure.  While 44% of whites and 46% of Latinos say the president’s race is a benefit to race relations, a plurality of African Americans, 42%, consider it to be detrimental.

Marist Poll Methodology

Nature of the Sample and Complete Tables

 

12/12: McClatchy-Marist Poll

In the aftermath of the grand jury’s decision not to indict a white police officer who killed an unarmed black man in Ferguson, Missouri, do Americans think federal civil rights charges should be brought against the police officer?  Find out in the latest national McClatchy-Marist Poll.

To read the full McClatchy article, click here.

12/7: Race Shapes Americans’ Attitudes about Decisions in Ferguson and Staten Island

December 7, 2014 by  
Filed under Featured, National, National Poll Archive, Politics

The grand jury decisions not to indict police officers who killed unarmed men in Ferguson, Missouri and Staten Island, New York have revealed a huge racial divide in how Americans perceive law enforcement in the United States.

While more than one in five white residents, 21%, reports increased confidence in the legal system following these decisions, seven in ten African Americans, 70%, have decreased confidence in the judicial system.

Additionally, whites are more than four times as likely as African Americans to have a great deal of confidence in police officers to treat blacks and whites equally, and whites are nearly four times more likely than African Americans to have a lot of trust in their local police officers to refrain from using excessive force when taking a suspect into custody.  White residents are also more than three times as likely as African Americans to believe local police do a good job enforcing the law.

By more than two-to-one, African Americans are more likely than whites to say law enforcement applies different standards to whites and blacks.

Age also impacts perceptions of law enforcement in the United States.  Americans under age 30 have a more negative view of police officials than older Americans.  However, when it comes to the grand jury decisions in Ferguson and Staten Island, younger Americans are more likely to say they have not heard anything about these decisions.

There is consensus in one area.  Regardless of race and age, Americans support requiring police officers to wear video recorders to monitor their policing procedures.

“These national poll results decidedly point to white and African Americans seeing similar events through a very different lens,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion.

Complete December 7, 2014 NBC News/Marist Poll of the United States

Poll points:

Law Enforcement in the United States

  • More than seven in ten residents, 72%, have either a great deal, 41%, or a fair amount, 31%, of confidence in their local police to refrain from using excessive force on a suspect.  12% have some trust in law enforcement to use an appropriate level of force, and 13% have very little confidence in them to do so.  By close to four to one, whites, 50%, are more likely than African Americans, 13%, to trust officers to not cross the line when dealing with a suspect.  29% of Latinos share this view.  Americans under 30 years old, 21%, are more likely than their older counterparts to report they have very little confidence in law enforcement to use appropriate force when apprehending a suspect.
  • When it comes to whether Americans think law enforcement applies different standards to whites and blacks, 47% of residents believe two sets of rules apply while 44% think everyone is held to the same standard.  But, more than eight in ten African Americans, 82%, believe police have different standards based on race while 51% of whites disagree.
  • 69% of U.S. residents report they have either a great deal, 44%, or fair amount, 25%, of confidence in police officers in their community to treat blacks and whites equally.  11% have some trust in them to do so, and 16% have very little confidence in them to act in this regard.  While 52% of whites express a great deal of confidence in their local police not to discriminate, only 12% of African Americans share this view.  Among Latinos, 29% have a high degree of trust in police officials to treat blacks and whites equally.  When compared with older Americans, residents under 30 years old, 34%, are less likely to have the view that law enforcement officials treat blacks and whites the same.
  • More than three in four Americans, 77%, say they have, at least, a fair amount of confidence in their local police to do a good job enforcing the law.  This includes 48% who have a great amount of trust and 29% who have a fair amount of confidence in their local police officials to enforce the law.  10% have some trust in police officers to carry out their job while 12% have very little confidence in them to do so.  55% of whites, compared with 17% of African Americans express a great deal of confidence in the police to do a good job enforcing the law.  41% of Latinos share this view.
  • Regardless of race and age, most Americans, 76%, think police officers should be required to wear video recorders to monitor their policing.  17% oppose this idea.

Marist Poll Methodology

Nature of the Sample and Complete Tables

11/2: Louisiana: Landrieu Leads Cassidy in Tuesday’s Election, but Cassidy has Advantage in Runoff

In Tuesday’s contest for U.S. Senate in Louisiana, Democratic incumbent Mary Landrieu, 44%, leads Republican Bill Cassidy, 36%, by 8 points among likely voters including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate or have voted early.  Republican Rob Maness receives 15%.

Partisan politics come into play.  Landrieu has secured her Democratic base.  Among Republicans likely to vote, Cassidy has the support of about seven in ten.  Maness draws more than one in five Republican likely voters.  A plurality of independent likely voters, 38%, supports Landrieu, but the majority of independents backs either Cassidy, 33%, or Maness, 20%.

If none of the candidates receives 50% of the vote, a runoff election will occur.  In a two-way contest against Landrieu, Cassidy is out in front.  Maness also has an edge over Landrieu should they square off in a runoff.

“Landrieu is well positioned to lead the field this Tuesday,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion.  “But, she would face an uphill fight to keep her seat against Bill Cassidy, her likely opponent in a runoff.”

Complete November 2, 2014 NBC News/Marist Poll of Louisiana

Poll points:

  • Among likely voters including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate or have voted early, Landrieu receives 44% to 36% for Cassidy and 15% for Maness in the race for U.S. Senate.  Four percent are undecided.
  • Most Democrats likely to vote, 86%, are for Landrieu.  Among Republicans likely to vote, Cassidy has 71%, and Maness garners 22%.  38% of independents likely to cast a ballot support Landrieu.  Cassidy has 33% to 20% for Maness among these voters.
  • 63% of likely voters with a candidate preference strongly support their choice of candidate for U.S. Senate.  Seven percent might vote differently.  More of Landrieu’s supporters, 71%, compared with 60% of Maness’ backers and 55% of those for Cassidy, report they are firmly committed to their choice of candidate.
  • Among registered voters, Landrieu, 42%, has a 7 point lead over Cassidy, 35%.  Maness receives 15%.  Six percent are undecided.
  • Landrieu’s negatives, 50%, are high among likely voters.  In contrast, likely voters, 41%, have an unfavorable view Cassidy.  Looking at Maness’ favorable score, 40% think well of him, and 37% have either never heard of him or are unsure how to rate him.
  • 19% of likely voters cite job creation and economic growth as the most important issue in deciding their vote for Congress on Tuesday followed closely by Social Security and Medicare, 17%, and health care, 17%.  Breaking partisan gridlock in Washington, 14%, also rates highly among likely voters.  The deficit and government spending, 7%, military action against ISIS, 6%, immigration, 6%, and looking out for the interests of women, 3%, round out the list.
  • In a Cassidy-Landrieu runoff, Cassidy has 50% to 45% for Landrieu among likely voters including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate.  Looking at a Maness-Landrieu runoff, Maness has 50% to 46% for Landrieu.  In both of these two-way matchups, the Republican candidate secures his party’s base and attracts a majority of independents likely to vote.
  • President Barack Obama’s approval rating is 39% among Louisiana residents.  55% disapprove.

Marist Poll Methodology

Nature of the Sample and Complete Tables

 

Next Page »