12/19: Whatever! Still Oh SO Annoying

December 19, 2013 by  
Filed under Featured, Living, Odds and Ends, Odds and Ends Polls

For the fifth straight year, Americans consider “whatever” to be the most annoying word or phrase in conversation today.  38% find “whatever” to be the most irritating while 22% report “like” gets on their nerves the most.  “You know” irks 18% of Americans while 14% want to see “just sayin’” stricken from casual conversation.  Six percent detest “obviously,” and 2% are unsure.

Click Here for Complete December 19, 2013 USA Marist Poll Release and Tables

There has been an increase in the proportion of residents who consider “whatever” to be the most annoying word.  In last year’s survey, 32% thought “whatever” was the most abrasive.  21% said “like” was most irritating while 17% thought “you know” was an unnecessary choice of words.  “Just sayin’” bothered 10% of Americans the most while “Twitterverse” — 9% — and “gotcha” — 5% — rounded out the list.  Five percent were unsure.

Table: Most Annoying Conversational Word or Phrase

“Obamacare” Taboo Term for 2014 

Looking ahead to 2014, which political word or phrase would Americans like to eliminate from the discussion?  More than four in ten — 41% — do not want to hear “Obamacare.”  There is also a strong aversion to Washington’s budget speak.  30% would prefer not to hear “shutdown” while 11% would like “gridlock” left out of the vernacular.  One in ten — 10% — does not want to hear “fiscal cliff” while 4% feel the same about “sequestration.”  Four percent are unsure.  Not surprisingly, Democrats and Republicans have a different take on what they don’t want to hear in 2014.  59% of Republicans have had it with “Obamacare,” while 45% of Democrats cringe at the sound of “shutdown.”

Table: Political Term Least Want to Hear in 2014

 

How the Survey was Conducted

Nature of the Sample

 

 

 

4/11: The Misconceptions about Aging

What are the top five myths about getting older?  A new survey undertaken by Home Instead Senior Care and The Marist Poll highlights some surprising realities of aging.

For the results, click here.

 

12/27: “Whatever” Still Viewed as Most Annoying Word or Phrase, Just Sayin’

December 27, 2012 by  
Filed under Featured, Living, Odds and Ends, Odds and Ends Polls

For the fourth consecutive year, Americans consider “whatever” to be the most annoying word or phrase in conversation.  More than three in ten — 32% — have this view while “like” irritates 21% of residents nationally.  17% are most irked by “you know” while 10% would prefer to ban “just sayin’” from today’s lexicon.  “Twitterverse” annoys 9% of adults while 5% are ticked off by “gotcha.”  Five percent are unsure.

Click Here for Complete December 27, 2012 USA Marist Poll Release and Tables

In last year’s survey, 38% thought “whatever” to be the most obnoxious word in casual conversation while 20% said “like” was the most irritating.  19% despised hearing “you know” while “just sayin’” was the most bothersome to 11% of Americans.  “Seriously” made last year’s list with 7% reporting it was the most annoying word in conversation.  Five percent, at that time, were unsure.

Table: Most Annoying Conversational Word or Phrase

How the Survey was Conducted

Nature of the Sample

 

11/14: Alzheimer’s Most Feared Disease

November 15, 2012 by  
Filed under Featured, Living, Odds and Ends, Odds and Ends Polls

More than any other disease, Americans are afraid of developing Alzheimer’s Disease.  This is according to a survey by Home Instead Senior Care conducted by The Marist Poll.

Do Americans think it would be harder to be diagnosed with Alzheimer’s or to care for someone who has the disease?

To find out more, click here.

 

5/21: The Weight Factor? More than Seven in Ten New Yorkers Tie Happiness and Success to Weight

They say money can’t buy happiness, but can being thin?  According to this NY1/YNN-Marist Poll, 72% of New York State adults think someone who is thin is happier than someone who is overweight.  13% disagree and report that a person who is overweight is happier, and 15% are unsure.

bathroom scale

Click Here for Complete May 21, 2012 NYS NY1/YNN-Marist Poll Release and Tables

When it comes to success, the same proportion of New York State adults — 72% — report someone who is thin is more successful while 8% say those who are overweight are.  One in five — 20% — is unsure.

Income makes a difference.  Nearly eight in ten New Yorkers who earn $100,000 or more a year — 79% — say thin people are more successful.  This compares with 72% of those who make between $50,000 and just under $100,000 annually and 69% who make less than $50,000 a year.

There is no age difference on this question.  Regardless of age, more than seven in ten think someone who is thin is more successful than someone who is overweight.

How do New Yorkers perceive their own weight?  68% describe themselves as about the right weight for their size and age.  29% say they are overweight while only 4% think they are underweight.

Table: Level of Happiness Related to Weight

Table: Level of Success Related to Weight

Table: Perceptions of Weight

Fast Food Fanatics?  Six in Ten New Yorkers Pass

60% of adults in New York say they have not eaten in a fast food restaurant during the past week.  One in four — 25% — visited a fast food joint at least one day last week, 7% have eaten a meal in such an establishment two days while 4% have dined at a fast food establishment three days.  Four is the number of days reported by 2% of New Yorkers while just 1% has eaten at a restaurant similar to McDonald’s, Burger King, and Wendy’s five days during the last week.  Two percent report eating at a fast food restaurant all seven days.

New Yorkers who report eating at a fast food restaurant in the past week did so on average of close to two days — 1.8 days.

Younger New Yorkers are more likely to have visited a fast food restaurant than older New Yorkers.  63% of New Yorkers under 30, 44% of those 30 to 44, 38% of residents 45 to 59, and 23% of those 60 and older have dined at this type of restaurant at least once in the past week.

Table: Number of Days Eaten a Meal in a Fast Food Restaurant

Table: Number of Days Eaten a Meal in a Fast Food Restaurant (Average)

Nature of the Sample

How the Survey was Conducted

5/17: Drivers Leading Cause of NYC Accidents, Say More Than Two-Thirds

68% of adults in New York City believe people driving cars are the cause of most accidents on city streets.  Nearly one in five — 19% — thinks people riding bicycles are most at fault while 13% blame pedestrians.

steering wheelClick Here for Complete May 17, 2012 NYC NY1-Marist Poll Release and Tables

While majorities of residents in the five boroughs think drivers are the cause of most accidents, more in Brooklyn — 74%, the Bronx — 70%, and in Queens and Staten Island — 67% — have this view compared with those in Manhattan — 59%.  About three in ten adults in Manhattan — 31% — believe bicyclists are the greatest accident threat.

Table: Leading Cause of Accidents on NYC Streets

How the Survey Was Conducted

Nature of the Sample

4/16: Money Matters

What difference does $50,000 make in the lives of Americans?  According to this Marist Poll conducted for Home Instead Senior Care, it has a big impact on their quality of life.

To read more, click here.

Survey Findings for “Money Matters”

2/7: Greatest Generation Likes Where It Is in Life

A multigenerational quality of life poll shows that Americans retain a positive outlook despite economic hardships and 76 percent believe “the best is yet to come,” and when they think about the quality of their life in the future, many are optimistic.

gold scoreTo read more, click here.

Survey findings for Greatest Generation Likes Where It Is in Life

1/19: Vote for Colbert? 18% in South Carolina Kinda Somewhat Likely

If Stephen Colbert were to run for president of the United States of South Carolina, almost one in five of South Carolina’s potential Republican primary electorate — 18% — say they are at least kinda somewhat likely to cast their ballot for Colbert.  This includes 4% who are very likely, 7% who are somewhat likely, and 7% who are kinda somewhat likely to support Colbert.  However, 13% report they are not too likely, and 56% say they are not likely at all to back Colbert.  Eight percent don’t know enough about him, and 4% are unsure.

Stephen Colbert

Stephen Colbert (Photo Credit: Scott Gries)

Click Here for Complete January 19th, 2012 South Carolina Marist Poll Release and Tables

However, support for Colbert grows among members of South Carolina’s potential Republican primary electorate who are aware of his possible run.  Among these voters, 22% say they are at least kinda somewhat likely to rally for Colbert.

“There’s no doubt Stephen Colbert’s potential run for the presidency of the United States of South Carolina is being noticed,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion.  “Not only do nearly one in five tell us they are kinda somewhat likely to support him, but he fares even better with those who are aware of his efforts.”

52% of the potential Republican primary electorate in South Carolina are aware that Stephen Colbert is exploring a potential candidacy for president of the United States of South Carolina.  48% are unaware or are unsure.

South Carolina does not allow for write-in candidates on its ballot.  However, Colbert may still be able to judge his support.  21% of the potential Republican primary electorate in the Palmetto State report they would be more likely to vote for former candidate Herman Cain if that vote served as encouragement for Colbert.  62% would be less likely to cast their ballot for Cain, and 9% are unsure.

On the specifics of Herman Cain’s image:

  • More than three in four members of the potential Republican primary electorate in South Carolina — 76% — think Cain is hard working.  14% say he is not, and 11% are unsure.
  • A majority — 58% — believes Cain embodies the American dream.  31% do not have this view, and 11% are unsure.
  • The potential Republican primary electorate in South Carolina divides about Herman Cain’s family values.  While 43% think Cain stands for family values, 44% disagree, and 14% are unsure.

Table: Likelihood of Support for Stephen Colbert’s Candidacy
Table: Likelihood of Support for Stephen Colbert’s Candidacy (Combined)
Table: Awareness of Stephen Colbert’s Potential Candidacy for the President
of the United States of South Carolina

Table: Influence on Vote for Herman Cain if Support Encourages Colbert
Table: Agree-Disagree: Herman Cain is Hard Working
Table: Agree-Disagree: Herman Cain Embodies the American Dream
Table: Agree-Disagree: Herman Cain Stands for Family Values

Majority Thinks Colbert Would Be No Better or Worse Than Any Other POTUS of SC

If Colbert were elected president of the United States of South Carolina, 55% of the potential primary electorate believe Colbert would be no better or worse than any of his predecessors.  Six percent report he would be one of the best, and 19% think he would be one of the worst.  One in five — 20% — is unsure.

While 53% of South Carolina’s potential Republican electorate are satisfied with the current candidates in the race, a notable 41% would like to see someone else enter the contest.  Six percent are undecided.

Table: Stephen Colbert’s Potential Legacy as President of the United States
of South Carolina

Table: Satisfaction with Candidates Running for President of United States

Colbert Support Influenced by Possibility of Real Change in Washington

Which factors would make members of the potential Republican primary electorate in South Carolina more likely to vote for Colbert?  Bringing about real change in Washington is the key factor.  Colbert’s truthiness also ranks high with voters followed by his stands on the issues and his family values.

Voters least like the fact that Stephen Colbert once had a Super PAC or has the same initials as South Carolina.  Most are also not likely to vote for him if he were a she.

Key points among South Carolina’s potential Republican primary electorate:

  • 49% of the potential Republican primary electorate would be more likely to support Colbert if he brings about real change in Washington while 37% would be less likely.
  • When it comes to Colbert’s truthiness, four in ten — 40% — would be more likely to throw their support behind Colbert while 41% would be less likely to do so.
  • Colbert’s stands on the issues would make 38% more likely to support him.  34% would be less likely to back him.
  • Regarding his family values, 37% would be more likely to rally for him while 36% would be less likely to do so.
  • Colbert is from South Carolina.  Does that positively impact the vote?  34% of South Carolina’s potential GOP electorate would be more likely to back him while 40% would be less likely to support Colbert.
  • What about Colbert’s experience talking on television?  26% would be more likely to get behind Colbert while 53% would be less likely to back him.
  • 18% would be more likely to support Colbert knowing that he is the most viable TV candidate.  62% are less likely.
  • If Colbert were a woman named Stephanie Colbert, 14% would be more likely to rally for Colbert while 66% would be less likely to tout him.
  • Having the same initials as South Carolina hurts Colbert’s level of support.  Only 13% would be more likely to back him while 70% would be less likely to throw their support toward Colbert.
  • The fact that Colbert once had a Super PAC is least liked.  Here, 10% of the potential Republican primary electorate would be more likely to back Colbert while 63% would be less likely to do so.

Table: Influence on Vote: He Would Represent Real Change in Washington
Table: Influence on Vote: His Truthiness
Table: Influence on Vote: His Stands on the Issues
Table: Influence on Vote: His Family Values
Table: Influence on Vote: He’s From South Carolina
Table: Influence on Vote: His Experience Talking on Television
Table: Influence on Vote: He’s the Most Viable TV Candidate
Table: Influence on Vote: If Stephen Colbert Were Stephanie Colbert
Table: Influence on Vote: S.C.
Table: Influence on Vote: He Once Had a Super PAC

Defining People

Three in four members of the potential Republican primary electorate — 75% — think only people are people while 19% believe corporations are people.  Six percent are unsure.

Table: Definition of People

Getting Serious

More than four in ten members of South Carolina’s potential Republican electorate — 41% — report this is the most serious poll they have ever participated in.  58% say it is not, and 2% are unsure.

Table: Are You Serious?

This Marist Poll was sponsored by Americans for a Better Tomorrow, Tomorrow.

How the Survey Was Conducted

Nature of the Sample

12/28: How Old is Old?

December 28, 2011 by  
Filed under Featured, Living, Odds and Ends, Odds and Ends Polls

At what age is someone considered old?  The short answer is, “It depends.”  According to this study by the Marist Institute for Public Opinion conducted for Home Instead Senior Care, the answer is based on age.

age definition

©istockphoto.com/Antoniooo

The age at which someone is considered old increases slightly for each generation.  Among Baby Boomers, old age doesn’t start until 77.  But, to what age do all of the generations want and think they will live?  What role does gender play?

For more information about Home Instead Senior Care, go to http://www.homeinstead.com.

Survey Findings for “How Old is Old?”

 

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