12/19: “Whatever,” AGAIN!

For the sixth consecutive year, “whatever” tops the list as the most annoying word or phrase used in casual conversation.  Americans’ irritability about the term crosses most demographic groups.  However, in the Northeast, “like” and “whatever” are almost equally irksome.  Americans younger than 30 are the least likely to be perturbed by hearing “whatever.”

Which word or phrase is thought to be the most overused in 2014?  “Selfie” earns that dubious distinction.  While there is a consensus among most groups, a plurality of residents under 30 consider “hashtag” to be the word or phrase used too often during the last year.

Complete December 19, 2014 Marist Poll of the United States 

Poll points:

  • A plurality of Americans, 43%, thinks “whatever” is the most annoying word or phrase used in casual conversation.  “Like” is the most irritating for 23% of the population while “literally” gets on the nerves of 13%.  One in ten residents, 10%, reports “awesome” grates on them while 8% would prefer not to hear “with all due respect.”  Last year, “whatever,” 38%, defeated “like” which received 22%, “you know” which had 18%, “just sayin’” which garnered 14%, and “obviously” which was cited by 6%.
  • Regional differences exist.  Residents in the South, 50%, Midwest, 49%, and West, 34%, perceive “whatever” to be the most bothersome in casual conversation.  In the Northeast, “like,” 34%, and “whatever,” 33% are considered almost equally as irritating.
  • Americans under 30 years old, 36%, are less likely than older Americans, 46%, to consider “whatever” to be the most annoying.
  • “Selfie” is considered the most overused word or phrase by 35% of residents nationally.  27% say “hashtag” is the most worn out word.  “Twerk” receives 16% while “YOLO” garners 8%.  Five percent cite “twittersphere” as excessively used while 1% reports “hipster” was used too often.
  • While a plurality of Americans 30 and older, 38%, say “selfie” is the most overused word of 2014, 32% of younger residents think “hashtag” was used too much.

Marist Poll Methodology

Nature of the Sample and Complete Tables

12/19: Whatever! Still Oh SO Annoying

December 19, 2013 by  
Filed under Featured, Living, Odds and Ends, Odds and Ends Polls

For the fifth straight year, Americans consider “whatever” to be the most annoying word or phrase in conversation today.  38% find “whatever” to be the most irritating while 22% report “like” gets on their nerves the most.  “You know” irks 18% of Americans while 14% want to see “just sayin’” stricken from casual conversation.  Six percent detest “obviously,” and 2% are unsure.

Click Here for Complete December 19, 2013 USA Marist Poll Release and Tables

There has been an increase in the proportion of residents who consider “whatever” to be the most annoying word.  In last year’s survey, 32% thought “whatever” was the most abrasive.  21% said “like” was most irritating while 17% thought “you know” was an unnecessary choice of words.  “Just sayin’” bothered 10% of Americans the most while “Twitterverse” — 9% — and “gotcha” — 5% — rounded out the list.  Five percent were unsure.

Table: Most Annoying Conversational Word or Phrase

“Obamacare” Taboo Term for 2014 

Looking ahead to 2014, which political word or phrase would Americans like to eliminate from the discussion?  More than four in ten — 41% — do not want to hear “Obamacare.”  There is also a strong aversion to Washington’s budget speak.  30% would prefer not to hear “shutdown” while 11% would like “gridlock” left out of the vernacular.  One in ten — 10% — does not want to hear “fiscal cliff” while 4% feel the same about “sequestration.”  Four percent are unsure.  Not surprisingly, Democrats and Republicans have a different take on what they don’t want to hear in 2014.  59% of Republicans have had it with “Obamacare,” while 45% of Democrats cringe at the sound of “shutdown.”

Table: Political Term Least Want to Hear in 2014

 

How the Survey was Conducted

Nature of the Sample

 

 

 

11/21: Kennedy’s Words Live on Fifty Years Later

November 21, 2013 by  
Filed under Featured, Odds and Ends Polls

Tomorrow marks the fiftieth anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, and many of President Kennedy’s words continue to ring true.  Which of the president’s quotes do Americans feel is most meaningful today?  More than six in ten — 62% — think, “Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country,” is most relevant.  More than one in five — 22% — believes the most meaningful quote from President Kennedy is, “Let us never negotiate out of fear, but let us never fear to negotiate.”  “The torch has been passed to a new generation of Americans — born in this century, tempered by war, disciplined by a hard and bitter peace” receives 7% while another 7% say, “We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard,” is the most memorable.  Three percent of Americans are unsure.

Click Here for Complete November 21, 2013 USA Marist Poll Release and Tables

Regardless of age, “Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country” is considered to be the most evocative John F. Kennedy quote.  72% of Americans 60 and older, 63% of those 45 to 59, and 57% of those 30 to 44 have this view.  Even a plurality of those under the age of 30, 47%, say the same.  Among this age group, one-third — 33% — reports that “Let us never negotiate out of fear, but let us never fear to negotiate” is the most relevant quote by John F. Kennedy.

And, when it comes to Kennedy’s legacy, most Americans say, fifty years from now, Kennedy will be remembered for his assassination and not his accomplishments while in office.  More than seven in ten adults nationally — 71% — report Kennedy’s death will be his legacy while 24% think the president’s initiatives will be thought of as the highlight of his administration.  Five percent are unsure.

Table: Most Meaningful Quote of President John F. Kennedy (U.S. Adults)

Table: Legacy of President John F. Kennedy (U.S. Adults)

Nearly Six in Ten Think JFK Assassination was a Conspiracy

58% of Americans believe Lee Harvey Oswald did not act alone when he shot and killed President Kennedy.  28% think only one person was involved, and 14% are unsure.  Americans under the age of 30 — 67% — are more likely than any other age group to say that Kennedy’s assassination was a conspiracy.  This compares with 54% of those 30 to 44, 57% of Americans 45 to 59, and 59% of those 60 and older.

How did Americans older than 54 years old find out about Kennedy’s death?  Television was the source for 35%.  27% heard from a teacher while 19% heard the news over the radio.  Five percent were told by a friend or neighbor, and an additional 5% heard from a colleague at work.  A family member was the first source of information for 4% of Americans older than 54 while 3% heard the tragic news from a stranger.  One percent learned the news from the newspaper while an additional 1% found out in another way.  One percent is unsure.

Table: Was President John F. Kennedy’s Assassination a Conspiracy?  (U.S. Adults)

Table: How Americans Learned of President John F. Kennedy’s Assassination (U.S. Adults Born Before 1959)

September 11th, Not Kennedy Assassination, Considered Most Significant Tragedy

When asked which tragic event was the most significant for people living at the time, nearly half of Americans — 49% — report the September 11th terrorist attacks were the most impactful event to have occurred.  36% report Pearl Harbor was the most significant while 13% report President Kennedy’s assassination was the most consequential.  One percent says the explosion of the Space Shuttle Challenger was the most significant.  Two percent are unsure.

Age plays a role.  Younger Americans are the most likely to say September 11th was the most significant tragic event.  Majorities of those under 30 — 57% — and those 30 to 44 — 53% — think September 11th had the most impact.  Nearly half — 49% — of Americans 45 to 59 agree.  However, among residents 60 and older, 41% think Pearl Harbor was the most significant event to occur while 40% have this impression of September 11th.

A gender gap exists.  55% of women think September 11th was the most significant.  This compares with 42% of men who say the same.  41% of men, however, believe Pearl Harbor was the most tragic event to occur.

Table: Most Significant Tragic Event (U.S. Adults)

How the Survey was Conducted

Nature of the Sample

 

 

4/11: The Misconceptions about Aging

What are the top five myths about getting older?  A new survey undertaken by Home Instead Senior Care and The Marist Poll highlights some surprising realities of aging.

For the results, click here.

 

12/27: “Whatever” Still Viewed as Most Annoying Word or Phrase, Just Sayin’

December 27, 2012 by  
Filed under Featured, Living, Odds and Ends, Odds and Ends Polls

For the fourth consecutive year, Americans consider “whatever” to be the most annoying word or phrase in conversation.  More than three in ten — 32% — have this view while “like” irritates 21% of residents nationally.  17% are most irked by “you know” while 10% would prefer to ban “just sayin’” from today’s lexicon.  “Twitterverse” annoys 9% of adults while 5% are ticked off by “gotcha.”  Five percent are unsure.

Click Here for Complete December 27, 2012 USA Marist Poll Release and Tables

In last year’s survey, 38% thought “whatever” to be the most obnoxious word in casual conversation while 20% said “like” was the most irritating.  19% despised hearing “you know” while “just sayin’” was the most bothersome to 11% of Americans.  “Seriously” made last year’s list with 7% reporting it was the most annoying word in conversation.  Five percent, at that time, were unsure.

Table: Most Annoying Conversational Word or Phrase

How the Survey was Conducted

Nature of the Sample

 

11/14: Alzheimer’s Most Feared Disease

November 15, 2012 by  
Filed under Featured, Living, Odds and Ends, Odds and Ends Polls

More than any other disease, Americans are afraid of developing Alzheimer’s Disease.  This is according to a survey by Home Instead Senior Care conducted by The Marist Poll.

Do Americans think it would be harder to be diagnosed with Alzheimer’s or to care for someone who has the disease?

To find out more, click here.

 

5/21: The Weight Factor? More than Seven in Ten New Yorkers Tie Happiness and Success to Weight

They say money can’t buy happiness, but can being thin?  According to this NY1/YNN-Marist Poll, 72% of New York State adults think someone who is thin is happier than someone who is overweight.  13% disagree and report that a person who is overweight is happier, and 15% are unsure.

bathroom scale

Click Here for Complete May 21, 2012 NYS NY1/YNN-Marist Poll Release and Tables

When it comes to success, the same proportion of New York State adults — 72% — report someone who is thin is more successful while 8% say those who are overweight are.  One in five — 20% — is unsure.

Income makes a difference.  Nearly eight in ten New Yorkers who earn $100,000 or more a year — 79% — say thin people are more successful.  This compares with 72% of those who make between $50,000 and just under $100,000 annually and 69% who make less than $50,000 a year.

There is no age difference on this question.  Regardless of age, more than seven in ten think someone who is thin is more successful than someone who is overweight.

How do New Yorkers perceive their own weight?  68% describe themselves as about the right weight for their size and age.  29% say they are overweight while only 4% think they are underweight.

Table: Level of Happiness Related to Weight

Table: Level of Success Related to Weight

Table: Perceptions of Weight

Fast Food Fanatics?  Six in Ten New Yorkers Pass

60% of adults in New York say they have not eaten in a fast food restaurant during the past week.  One in four — 25% — visited a fast food joint at least one day last week, 7% have eaten a meal in such an establishment two days while 4% have dined at a fast food establishment three days.  Four is the number of days reported by 2% of New Yorkers while just 1% has eaten at a restaurant similar to McDonald’s, Burger King, and Wendy’s five days during the last week.  Two percent report eating at a fast food restaurant all seven days.

New Yorkers who report eating at a fast food restaurant in the past week did so on average of close to two days — 1.8 days.

Younger New Yorkers are more likely to have visited a fast food restaurant than older New Yorkers.  63% of New Yorkers under 30, 44% of those 30 to 44, 38% of residents 45 to 59, and 23% of those 60 and older have dined at this type of restaurant at least once in the past week.

Table: Number of Days Eaten a Meal in a Fast Food Restaurant

Table: Number of Days Eaten a Meal in a Fast Food Restaurant (Average)

Nature of the Sample

How the Survey was Conducted

5/17: Drivers Leading Cause of NYC Accidents, Say More Than Two-Thirds

68% of adults in New York City believe people driving cars are the cause of most accidents on city streets.  Nearly one in five — 19% — thinks people riding bicycles are most at fault while 13% blame pedestrians.

steering wheelClick Here for Complete May 17, 2012 NYC NY1-Marist Poll Release and Tables

While majorities of residents in the five boroughs think drivers are the cause of most accidents, more in Brooklyn — 74%, the Bronx — 70%, and in Queens and Staten Island — 67% — have this view compared with those in Manhattan — 59%.  About three in ten adults in Manhattan — 31% — believe bicyclists are the greatest accident threat.

Table: Leading Cause of Accidents on NYC Streets

How the Survey Was Conducted

Nature of the Sample

4/16: Money Matters

What difference does $50,000 make in the lives of Americans?  According to this Marist Poll conducted for Home Instead Senior Care, it has a big impact on their quality of life.

To read more, click here.

Survey Findings for “Money Matters”

2/7: Greatest Generation Likes Where It Is in Life

A multigenerational quality of life poll shows that Americans retain a positive outlook despite economic hardships and 76 percent believe “the best is yet to come,” and when they think about the quality of their life in the future, many are optimistic.

gold scoreTo read more, click here.

Survey findings for Greatest Generation Likes Where It Is in Life

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