6/28: The Sale of Human Organs for Transplants

June 28, 2016 by  
Filed under Featured, Health, Living

A majority of Americans oppose legalizing the sale of human organs for transplant purposes, and nearly half of U.S. residents consider such sales to be wrong, according to an Exclusive Point Taken-Marist Poll, commissioned by WGBH Boston for its new late-night, multi-platform PBS debate series Point Taken.  While a plurality of Americans think legalization of this process would help regulate the sale of human organs, notable concern about a black market exists.

The national survey was conducted by The Marist Poll in advance of this week’s Point Taken episode, airing Tuesday, June 28th at 11pmET (check local listings) and streaming on pbs.org/pointtaken. The series is hosted by Carlos Watson, Emmy Award winning journalist and OZY Media co-founder and CEO.

55% of Americans do not think the sale of human organs for transplant purposes should be legal.  33% support such action.  Women, 62%, are more likely than men, 48%, to oppose legalizing the sale of human organs for transplants.  Millennials, 42%, are more likely than older Americans to favor the legalization of these transactions.  Members of Gen X, 24%, are the least likely to support legalization.

In assessing the moral dimension of this debate, 49% of U.S. residents believe it is wrong for someone to sell their organs, such as a kidney, to a transplant patient who can afford to pay the price.  Again, gender and generational differences are present.  Women, 58%, are more likely than men, 40%, to consider it wrong to sell human organs to transplant patients.  Generationally, Millennials, 52%, are more likely than other generations to think receiving money for one’s organs is acceptable.

What effect would legalizing the sale of human organs have?  A plurality of Americans, 47%, including 30% who are against permitting these transactions, assert that legalizing the sale of human organs would provide regulations and minimize the risks.  But, more than four in ten Americans, 41%, say it would lead to a black market and endanger lives.  Men, 53%, are more inclined than women, 41%, to perceive the positive benefit of legalizing the sale of human organs.

“Tonight on Point Taken, we debate the legal and moral implications of the sale of human organs,” says Denise DiIanni, series creator and Senior Executive-In-Charge, “as well as questions of how we decide who gets access to life saving organs.”

When only one organ is available and several patients need that organ for survival, 56% of Americans say the best way to decide who should be the beneficiary is to give it to the patient who has been waiting the longest.  51% of men, compared with 62% of women, say those highest on the waiting list should receive the available organ.  Of all the generations, Gen X, 69%, is the most likely to support this method of selection.

A majority of Americans, 56%, report the worst way to decide to whom the organ should go is to assign it through auction and provide it to the person who can pay the most for it.  Those who earn $50,000 or more annually, 64%, are more likely than those who make less, 50%, to have this view.  Members of the Silent-Greatest generation, 38%, are the least likely to consider bidding to be the worst method and are more than twice as likely as any other generation to say using the waiting list is the worst way to select a transplant recipient.

On the personal level, most Americans, 81%, report they would not be likely to sell one of their kidneys.  Residents who make less than $50,000 a year, 24%, are twice as likely as those who earn more, 12%, to say they would sell a kidney.  Millennials, 27%, are more likely than older generations to say the same.

A majority of Americans, 55%, say they would not allow their heirs to sell their organs after death although members of the Silent-Greatest generation divide, 47% to 47%.

This survey of 516 adults was conducted May 24th and May 25th, 2016 by The Marist Poll sponsored and funded in partnership with WGBH’s Point Taken.  Adults 18 years of age and older residing in the contiguous United States were contacted on landline or mobile numbers and interviewed in English by telephone using live interviewers.  Results are statistically significant within ±4.3 percentage points. The error margin was not adjusted for sample weights and increases for cross-tabulations.

Complete June 28, 2016 USA Exclusive Point Taken – Marist Poll Release

Complete June 28, 2016 USA Exclusive Point Taken – Marist Poll Banners (Banner 1: Gender, Race, Age, Education, Income)

Complete June 28, 2016 USA Exclusive Point Taken – Marist Poll Banners (Banner 2: Generation, Party ID, Ideology)

Marist Poll Methodology

Marist Poll Nature of the Sample and Complete Tables

 

5/3: 65 Stands Strong as “Middle-Aged”

Forget the contests for the Democratic and Republican presidential nominations.  The biggest question facing the Marist Institute for Public Opinion this year is whether Americans consider the age of the Institute’s director, Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, to be old!

As Dr. Miringoff turns 65, he remains unscathed!  A majority of Americans, 55%, say 65 is middle-aged.  34% consider it old, and more than one in ten, 11%, thinks age 65 is young.  Similar proportions of U.S. residents thought 64 to be old last year.

Not surprisingly, perceptions differ based on age.  Americans 45 years old and older, 63%, are more likely than younger residents to consider 65 to be middle-aged.  Those under 45 divide.  49% think 65 years of age is old while 47% say it is middle-aged.  This is driven by Americans under 30, among whom 60% call 65 “old.”

Complete May 3, 2016 Marist Poll of the United States

Marist Poll Methodology

Nature of the Sample and Complete Tables

12/22: Weight Loss Top New Year’s Resolution… Finding a Better Job Gains Traction

December 22, 2015 by  
Filed under Celebrations, Celebrations Polls, Featured, Living

Health and employment are top of mind heading into 2016.  Among Americans who plan to make a New Year’s resolution, weight loss, 12%, takes the top spot followed by getting a better job, 10%.  Exercising more, 9%, quitting smoking, 9%, and improving one’s, overall, health, 9%, round out the top five New Year’s resolutions for 2016.

While weight loss, 13%, was the leading resolution for 2015, finding a better job was the goal of just 5%.  But, this year, fueled by people under 45, among whom it’s number one, getting a better job also rivals the top spot for all Americans.

Do Americans plan to make a resolution for 2016?  Less than four in ten Americans, 39%, say they are very likely or likely to do so.  This is down from 44% last year.  However, similar to last year, younger Americans are more likely to resolve to change than older Americans in the New Year.

Many Americans are also true to their word.  Nearly two-thirds of those who made a resolution for 2015, 64%, report they kept their resolution, at least, in part.  Similar proportions of men, 65%, and women, 63%, say they kept their promise.  The proportion of women who kept their resolution increased from 55% last year.

Complete December 22, 2015 Marist Poll of the United States

Poll points:

  • 12% of Americans who are likely to make a New Year’s resolution vow to lose weight. 10% want to find a better job.  Getting more exercise, 9%, ceasing smoking, 9%, and improving their health, 9%, follow.  Eight percent want to be a better person, and another 8% say they will try to eat healthier in the New Year.  Seven percent resolve to spend less and save more.  Last year, 13% vowed to lose weight, 10% promised to exercise more, 9% resolved to be a better person, and 8% wanted to improve their health.  Quitting smoking, 7%, spending less and saving more, 7%, and eating healthier, 7%, followed.
  • Regional differences exist.  One in five Northeast residents who plan to make a resolution, 20%, resolve to find a better job.  However, in the Midwest, quitting smoking, 12%, improving one’s health, 11%, and eating healthier, 10%, vie for the top spot.  13% of those in the South cite weight loss while 12% mention saving more and spending less.  Among those in the West, 13% want to find a new job, 12% cite exercising more, and 11% mention weight loss.
  • Women, 16%, are more likely than men, 6%, to mention weight loss.  Men, 13%, put finding a better job at the top of their list.  Quitting smoking, 11%, and exercising more, 10%, follow.
  • 39% of Americans are very likely or likely to make a resolution for 2016 while 61% are not likely at all to do so.  The proportion of Americans making resolutions is down from 44% last year and at the lowest point since 2011 when 38% of residents vowed to do so.
  • Americans under 45, 47%, are more likely than older residents, 31%, to make a resolution.  Still, the proportion of younger Americans making resolutions is down from 56%.
  • Among those who vowed to change something in their life last year, 64% kept that resolution, at least, in part.
  • Similar proportions of men, 65%, and women, 63%, kept their 2015 New Year’s resolution.  There has been an increase in the proportion of women who kept their word, up from 55% previously.

Marist Poll Methodology

Nature of the Sample and Complete Tables

12/21: “Whatever” Most Annoying Word for Seventh Year

December 21, 2015 by  
Filed under Featured, Living, Odds and Ends, Odds and Ends Polls

Whatever! 

For the seventh consecutive year, “whatever” tops the list as the word or phrase Americans, 43%, consider to be the most annoying.  “No offense, but” is a distant second with 22% followed closely by “like” with 20%.  Seven percent are irked by “no worries” while 3% consider “huge” to be most irritating.

Complete December 21, 2015 Marist Poll of the United States

In last year’s survey, the same proportion, 43%, called “whatever” the most annoying word followed by “like” with 23%.  “Literally” received 13% while 10% mentioned “awesome.”  Eight percent chose “with all due respect” as the most irritating word or phrase in 2014.

Regardless of age, race, gender, region of residence, income, or level of education, “whatever” is thought to be the most bothersome word in casual conversation today.  Of note, Americans in the South, 48%, and Midwest, 46%, are more likely than those in the Northeast, 38%, and in the West, 36%, to dislike the word, “whatever.”  African Americans, 54%, are more likely to be annoyed by “whatever, than whites, 41%, or Latinos, 42%.

Marist Poll Methodology

Nature of the Sample and Complete Tables

5/1: Middle-Aged Wishes and Birthday Cake Dreams

Blow out the candles and make a wish!  It’s time for Dr. Lee M. Miringoff’s annual birthday poll.

Every year, Dr. Miringoff, director of the Marist College Institute for Public Opinion, yearns to know whether Americans consider his soon-to-be age young, middle-aged, or old.  This year, Dr. Miringoff’s wish may come true one more time. 

Click Here for Complete May 1, 2015 USA Marist Poll Release and Tables

Nearly six in ten Americans, 57%, say 64 is middle-aged.  31% consider it old, and 12% think it is young.  Miringoff’s age hangs on to the description of “middle-aged.”  Last year, when he turned 63 years old, 60% said he was a middle-ager, 27% thought he was old, and 13% described him as young.

“Phew,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, director of the Marist College Institute for Public Opinion.  “I would be less than honest if I didn’t notice the increase among Americans who think my age is old.  But, overall, I survived another year!”

Younger Americans, not surprisingly, are more likely than their older counterparts to consider 64 to be old.  Among Americans under 30, six in ten, 60%, think 64 years of age is old, up from 48% last year who thought 63 was old.

Gender differences exist.  While similar proportions of women, 13%, and men, 10%, say 64 is young, women, 61%, are more likely than men, 52%, to think it is middle-aged.  Nearly four in ten men, 38%, compared with 25% of women, believe 64 is old.

Marist Poll Methodology

Marist Poll Nature of the Sample and Complete Tables

12/19: “Whatever,” AGAIN!

December 19, 2014 by  
Filed under Featured, Living, Odds and Ends, Odds and Ends Polls

For the sixth consecutive year, “whatever” tops the list as the most annoying word or phrase used in casual conversation.  Americans’ irritability about the term crosses most demographic groups.  However, in the Northeast, “like” and “whatever” are almost equally irksome.  Americans younger than 30 are the least likely to be perturbed by hearing “whatever.”

Which word or phrase is thought to be the most overused in 2014?  “Selfie” earns that dubious distinction.  While there is a consensus among most groups, a plurality of residents under 30 consider “hashtag” to be the word or phrase used too often during the last year.

Complete December 19, 2014 Marist Poll of the United States 

Poll points:

  • A plurality of Americans, 43%, thinks “whatever” is the most annoying word or phrase used in casual conversation.  “Like” is the most irritating for 23% of the population while “literally” gets on the nerves of 13%.  One in ten residents, 10%, reports “awesome” grates on them while 8% would prefer not to hear “with all due respect.”  Last year, “whatever,” 38%, defeated “like” which received 22%, “you know” which had 18%, “just sayin’” which garnered 14%, and “obviously” which was cited by 6%.
  • Regional differences exist.  Residents in the South, 50%, Midwest, 49%, and West, 34%, perceive “whatever” to be the most bothersome in casual conversation.  In the Northeast, “like,” 34%, and “whatever,” 33% are considered almost equally as irritating.
  • Americans under 30 years old, 36%, are less likely than older Americans, 46%, to consider “whatever” to be the most annoying.
  • “Selfie” is considered the most overused word or phrase by 35% of residents nationally.  27% say “hashtag” is the most worn out word.  “Twerk” receives 16% while “YOLO” garners 8%.  Five percent cite “twittersphere” as excessively used while 1% reports “hipster” was used too often.
  • While a plurality of Americans 30 and older, 38%, say “selfie” is the most overused word of 2014, 32% of younger residents think “hashtag” was used too much.

Marist Poll Methodology

Nature of the Sample and Complete Tables

12/18: Holiday Spending Status Quo… Weight Loss Top Resolution for 2015

December 18, 2014 by  
Filed under Celebrations, Celebrations Polls, Featured, Living

With Chanukah underway and just one week until Christmas, many Americans who purchase holiday gifts won’t be cutting corners on their seasonal shopping.  A majority of holiday shoppers say they plan to spend about the same amount of money as they did last year, and more than one in ten gift givers intends to spend more.  Although down from last year, financial concerns are top of mind for nearly one-third of shoppers who report they will be cutting back this holiday season.

How are shoppers making their purchases?  Sixin ten plan to use cash to buy their holiday gifts, similar to last year.  About one in five expects to do most or all of their shopping online.

Looking to 2015, are Americans vowing to make a change?  More than four in ten Americans expect to make a resolution, and weight loss tops the list of improvements for the New Year.  However, more Americans have let their resolutions slide.  Of those who made a promise going into 2014, only 59% kept their word, down from 72% the previous year.  Men are slightly more likely than women to have kept their resolution.

Complete December 18, 2014 Marist Poll of the United States

Poll points:

  • A majority of Americans who spend money on holiday shopping, 55%, plans to spend the same amount of money as they did last year.  32% say they will spend less money, and 13% will spend more.  Fewer holiday shoppers expect to spend less than last year.  In 2013, 52% reported they intended to maintain the same level of spending as in the past.  Nearly four in ten, 38%, thought they would reduce their holiday expenditures, and 10% said they would spend more (Trend).
  • While there has been little change in the spending habits of holiday shoppers who earn $50,000 or more, there has been a positive shift in the spending of those who earn less.  Half of holiday shoppers who make less than $50,000, 50%, will spend about the same as last year, up from 43% in 2013.  36% of these shoppers expect to spend less, compared with 45% in 2013.
  • More than six in ten holiday shoppers who are 45 or older, 62%, say they will spend about the same amount of money as they did last year.  This compares with 53% in 2013 who reported they would spend about as much as the previous year.  Fewer Americans in this age group who purchase presents, 29%, expect to spend less, down from 40% in 2013.  There has been little change in the holiday spending habits of younger Americans.
  • Six in ten holiday shoppers, 60%, little changed from 63% last year, expect to mostly use cash when buying their holiday gifts.  37% plan to use, for the most part, credit cards, and 3% are unsure.
  • How do Americans who buy holiday gifts plan to make their purchases?  19% say they will do all or most of their shopping online.  44% will buy some of their seasonal purchases via the Internet while 38% don’t plan to use the Internet to purchase any of their holiday gifts.  There has been little change on this question since last year (Trend).
  • Turning to New Year’s resolutions, 44% of Americans, identical to last year, are very likely or somewhat likely to make a New Year’s resolution for 2015.  Similar to last year, younger Americans are more likely than older Americans to resolve to change (Trend).  56% of those younger than 45, compared with 33% of those 45 and older, plan to make a change to their lifestyle.  Similar proportions of men, 43%, and women, 44%, are, at least, somewhat likely to make a resolution.
  • Weight loss is the top resolution this year cited by 13% of Americans who vow to make a change in 2015.  Exercising more follows with 10%.  Nine percent want to be a better person while 8% mention improving their health.  With 7% each, stopping smoking, spending less and saving more money, and eating healthier rounds out the top-tier in the complete list of 2015 New Year’s resolutions.  The top resolutions for 2014 were spending less and saving more, being a better person, and exercising more each with 12%.  Weight loss came in fourth with 11% while health improvements, eating healthier, and ceasing smoking each received 8% of those who were likely to make a resolution for 2014.
  • Among adults nationally who said they made a resolution for 2014, 59% kept their resolution for, at least, part of the year.  41% did not.  This is a change from the previous year (Trend).  Among those who made a resolution for 2013, 72% kept their word.
  • Men, 64%, are more likely than women, 55%, to report they stuck to their 2014 resolution for at least part of the year.

Marist Poll Methodology

Nature of the Sample and Complete Tables

 

7/21: Fashion Forward?

Coco Chanel, Burberry, Calvin Klein, Dior, Anna Wintour, Christian Louboutin, Dolce & Gabbana, Prada: the list goes on.  These influential names and brands in fashion are familiar to many Americans.  Because we are familiar with these names, does it mean we are too focused on fashion? Many Americans, 68%, think we focus too much on fashion, while one quarter, 26%, say that the attention is about right.  Only 7% believe fashion deserves more consideration.  However, a majority, 55%, also say how they dress is an important part of who they are.  Fewer Americans, 45%, report that choosing their outfit isn’t something they think about.

Click Here for Complete July 14, 2014 Marist Poll Release and Tables

Does style need to come with a couture price tag? Most Americans say it does not.  More than eight in ten Americans, 86%, say it’s possible to be stylish on a limited budget, while only 14% believe good fashion is just for those with a lot of money.  But, while great style may not need to break the bank, many Americans, 65%, believe that fashion communicates status and divides people into social classes.  Far fewer, 35%, disagree.

Aside from money, does fashion also require as much creativity as playing a musical instrument or painting a picture? Here, Americans divide.  Just over half, 53%, of Americans say it doesn’t but 47% believe good style calls for creative thinking.  Although putting an outfit together may call for creativity there are pressures to fit in.  While a majority of Americans, 57%, believe someone who dresses very differently than most people is stylish, a notable proportion, 35%, say they’re strange.

Marist Poll Methodology

Nature of the Sample and Complete Tables

5/1: What’s in a Number?

It’s time to wish The Marist Poll’s fearless leader, Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, a happy birthday!  What are Americans giving Dr. Miringoff this year?  Their gift is another year of being middle-aged!  Six in ten adults nationally — 60% — think Dr. Miringoff’s current age, 63 years old, is middle-aged.  27% consider it old, and 13% say it is young.

Click Here for Complete May 1, 2014 USA Marist Poll Release and Tables

“I’m very gratified with these results,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion.  “Truth be told, when I wanted to reach 6 – 3, I was thinking height not age.”

The good news is Americans’ attitudes have changed little since last year.  At that time, 59% thought Dr. Miringoff’s age, 62, was middle-aged.  28% said 62 was old, and an identical 13% believed it to be young.

Age matters. Younger Americans are nearly three times as likely than older residents to think 63 is old.  42% of those under 45 have this opinion.  This compares with 15% of those 45 or older.

Table: How Old is 63?

 How the Survey was Conducted

Nature of the Sample

Dr. Lee M. Miringoff reacts to the findings of his latest birthday poll.  Watch the video below.


12/23:Turning Over a New Leaf in 2014?

December 23, 2013 by  
Filed under Celebrations, Celebrations Polls, Featured, Living

Are Americans resolving to make a change in the New Year?  More than four in ten — 44% — plan to do so, up slightly from 40% last year.  Once again, residents younger than 45 years old — 54% — are more likely than older Americans — 37% — to vow to improve an aspect of their lives in the coming year.

Click Here for Complete December 23, 2013 USA Marist Poll Release and Tables

Similar proportions of women — 44% — and men — 43% — expect to make a New Year’s resolution this year.  Last year, identical proportions of men and women — 40% — said they would resolve to make a change in 2013.

Table: Likelihood of Making Resolution

Table: Likelihood of Making Resolution (Over Time)

 

2014 Resolutions Run the Gamut

What are Americans resolving to change in 2014?  There is little consensus.  12% of those who plan to make a resolution want to spend less and save more.  12% will try to be a better person while an additional 12% promise to exercise more.  11% say they resolve to lose weight while 8% plan to improve their health.  An additional 8% resolve to eat healthier, and another 8% promise to stop smoking.  For women, resolving to be a better person or to lose weight tops the list of intentions.  Each is mentioned by 14% of women looking to use the New Year as an opportunity to change.  For men, top goals include 12% who are hoping to spend less money and save more, and another 12% who intend to exercise more.

Last year, health improvements were top of mind.  17% of Americans who made a resolution for 2013 said they would lose weight, and 13% planned to quit smoking.  One in ten — 10% — promised to be a better person while 9% said they would save more money and spend less.  Eight percent vowed to exercise more.

Table: Top New Year’s Resolutions

Table: Complete List of New Year’s Resolutions

More Americans Keeping Their Promises 

72% of Americans who made a resolution for 2013 kept their word for, at least, part of the year.  28%, however, did not.  The proportion of those who made a resolution and stuck to it has increased.  Last year, 59% who made a resolution for 2012 kept their promise.  More than four in ten — 41% — let their resolution slide.

Table: Kept 2013 Resolution?

Table: Kept Resolution? (Over Time)

 

How the Survey was Conducted

Nature of the Sample

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