11/5: Obama and Romney Deadlocked in Virginia

As the presidential campaign enters its final hours, President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden — 48% — and Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan — 47% — are still neck and neck among likely voters in Virginia, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted early.  One percent is for another candidate, and 3% are undecided.

“Obama and Romney are closely matched in the battle for Virginia’s 13 electoral votes, and both candidates are viewed more positively by more voters than not,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion.  “Voters are also evenly divided about who can better handle the economy.”

Click Here for Complete November 5, 2012 Virginia NBC News/WSJ/Marist Poll Release

Click Here for Complete November 5, 2012 Virginia NBC News/WSJ/Marist Poll Tables

When NBC News/WSJ/Marist last reported this question in its October 11th survey, Romney and Ryan had 48% to 47% for Obama and Biden among Virginia likely voters, including those who were undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted absentee.  One percent backed another candidate, and 4%, at that time, were undecided.

Key points:

  • Party ID.  Among Democrats who are likely to vote, 95% support Obama.  The same proportion of Republicans who are likely to cast a ballot — 95% —  is behind Romney.  Among independent likely voters, 48% support Romney compared with 43% for Obama.
  • Enthusiasm.  71% of Virginia likely voters are very enthusiastic to vote.  Looking at each candidate’s supporters, 75% of Obama’s supporters express a high degree of enthusiasm compared with 73% of those who back Romney and are likely to vote.  Enthusiasm has grown in the state.  In NBC News/WSJ/Marist’s previous survey, 64% of Virginia likely voters were very enthusiastic about casting their ballot.  At that time, 66% of Obama’s supporters had a high degree of enthusiasm about going to the polls while 65% of Romney’s backers said the same.
  • Intensity of support.  89% of likely voters in Virginia who have a candidate preference are strongly committed to their choice.  Nine percent are somewhat behind their selection, and 1% might vote differently.  One percent is unsure.  90% of Obama’s supporters are securely in his camp compared with 88% of Romney’s backers who say the same.
  • Gender.  A gender gap exists, but has narrowed.  51% of women who are likely to cast a ballot now support Obama while 45% are for Romney.  In a similar poll conducted last month, 54% of women likely to vote supported Obama, and 42% backed Romney.  In the current survey, among men who are likely to vote, 50% back Romney compared with 45% for Obama.  In the earlier poll, 55% of men likely to vote sided with Romney, and 40% were behind Obama.
  • Age.  Among likely voters under the age of 30, Obama leads Romney, 60% to 34%.  52% of likely voters 30 to 44 are for Obama compared with 43% for Romney.  Romney — 51% — has the advantage over Obama — 43% — among likely voters 45 to 59.  Among those 60 and older, Romney — 52% — is ahead of Obama — 45%.
  • Early voters.  15% of registered voters in Virginia say they have already voted or plan to do so early.  Among likely voters, Obama — 59% — leads Romney — 38%.  However, Romney — 51% — is ahead of Obama — 45% — among likely voters who plan to go to the polls on Tuesday.

Among registered voters in Virginia, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted early, Obama receives 48% to 46% for Romney.  Two percent support another candidate, and 4% are undecided.

Table: 2012 Presidential Tossup (VA Likely Voters with Leaners and Early Voters)

Table: Enthusiasm to Vote (VA Likely Voters)

Table: Intensity of Support (VA Likely Voters)

Table: 2012 Presidential Tossup (VA Registered Voters with Leaners and Early Voters)

Majority with Favorable Impression of Obama…Romney Favorability at 50%

51% of likely voters in Virginia have a favorable opinion of President Obama.  45% do not, and 3% are unsure.

When NBC News/WSJ/Marist last reported this question, the same proportions held these views.  51% of Virginia likely voters thought well of Obama while 45% had an unfavorable view of him.  Three percent, at that time, were unsure.

When it comes to Romney, 50% have a favorable impression of him.  45%, however, have an unfavorable one, and 6% are unsure.

In mid-October, 49% of likely voters had a positive opinion of the candidate while 44% did not.  Seven percent, at that time, were unsure.

Table: President Barack Obama Favorability (VA Likely Voters)

Table: Mitt Romney Favorability (VA Likely Voters)

Voters Divide about the Candidate Who Will Better Handle Economy…Obama Bests Romney on Foreign Policy

Which candidate do registered voters in Virginia think will better handle the nation’s economy?  47% think Romney is the stronger candidate while 46% believe Obama is the man for the job.  Seven percent are unsure.  Likely voters in Virginia agree.  48% of these voters say Romney will turn the country’s economy around while 46% believe Obama will get the economy back on track.  Six percent are unsure.

Previously, 47% of registered voters had more confidence in Romney to improve the U.S. economy while 45% believed Obama was more capable on the issue.  Eight percent were unsure.

When it comes to foreign policy, Obama — 50% — tops Romney — 42% — among registered voters in Virginia.  Eight percent are unsure.  Among likely voters statewide, 50% think Obama is the foreign policy candidate while 44% have this impression of Romney.  Seven percent are unsure.

In mid-October, Obama — 49% — topped Romney — 43% — on the issue of foreign policy among Virginia registered voters.  Eight percent, at that time, were unsure.

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling the Economy (VA Registered Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling the Economy (VA Likely Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling Foreign Policy (VA Registered Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling Foreign Policy (VA Likely Voters)

Voters Divide Over President’s Job Performance…Kudos for Handling of Hurricane

49% of registered voters in Virginia approve of the job Obama is doing in office.  47% disapprove, and 5% are unsure.

Previously, 48% of Virginia registered voters gave the president high marks while 46% thought he missed the mark.  Six percent, then, were unsure.

How do registered voters in Virginia think the president is handling Hurricane Sandy?  71% approve of his actions while 14% do not.  15% are unsure.  Looking at party, 95% of Democrats approve of Obama’s response.  50% of Republicans agree.  Among independents, 68% think well of how the president has been handling the situation.

Likely voters in Virginia agree.  71% of likely voters statewide approve of how the president has been handling the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy.  15% do not, and 14% are unsure.

Table: President Obama Approval Rating in Virginia (VA Registered Voters)

Table: Obama’s Handling of Hurricane Sandy (VA Registered Voters)

Table: Obama’s Handling of Hurricane Sandy (VA Likely Voters)

Almost Half Think the Country is on Wrong Track

Looking at the direction of the nation, 49% of registered voters in Virginia believe it is off the rails.  46% say it is on the right path, and 4% are unsure.

In NBC News/WSJ/Marist’s previous survey, 53% of registered voters statewide said the country was moving in the wrong direction.  43% thought it was moving in the right one, and 4% were unsure.

Table: Right or Wrong Direction of the Country (VA Registered Voters)

Kaine and Allen in Close Contest in U.S. Senate Race in Virginia

Among likely voters in Virginia, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted early, 49% support Democrat Tim Kaine while 46% are for Republican George Allen.  Less than 1% backs another candidate, and 4% are undecided.

In mid-October, Kaine — 47% — and Allen — 46% — were in a competitive contest among likely voters in Virginia, including those who were undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted absentee.  Seven percent were undecided.

Among registered voters in Virginia, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted early, 49% are behind Kaine while 46% are for Allen.  One percent supports another candidate, and 5% are undecided.

Table: 2012 U.S. Senate Tossup in Virginia: Kaine/Allen (VA Likely Voters with Leaners and Early Voters)

Table: 2012 U.S. Senate Tossup in Virginia: Kaine/Allen (VA Registered Voters with Leaners and Early Voters)

How the Survey was Conducted

Nature of the Sample

11/3: Floridians Applaud Obama’s Handling of Hurricane Sandy

Nearly seven in ten registered voters in Florida approve of how President Barack Obama is dealing with the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, including a slim majority of Republicans.  Overall, 69% give the president good reviews while only 11% disapprove.  20% are unsure.  This includes 89% of Democrats, 51% of Republicans, and 65% of independents who approve of the president’s handling of the super storm.

Click Here for Complete November 3, 2012 Florida NBC News/WSJ/Marist Poll Release

Click Here for Complete November 3, 2012 Florida NBC News/WSJ/Marist Poll Tables

Likely voters in the state have similar views.  70% praise the way Obama handled the situation.  11% believe he should have acted differently, and 20% are unsure.

Table: Obama’s Handling of Hurricane Sandy (FL Registered Voters)

Table: Obama’s Handling of Hurricane Sandy (FL Likely Voters)

Post-Hurricane Sandy, Obama and Romney in Close Contest in Florida

In the presidential contest in Florida, President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden — 49% — and Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan — 47% — are locked in a battle among likely voters in Florida, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate or voted early.  One percent backs another candidate, and 2% are undecided.

“President Obama is getting good reviews for his handling of Hurricane Sandy,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion.  “But, Obama is under 50%, and the big question is whether or not Romney can attract the remaining undecided voters to tip the scales.”

When NBC News/WSJ/Marist last reported this question in its October 11th survey, Obama and Biden had the support of 48% to 47% for Romney and Ryan among likely voters in Florida, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate or voted by absentee.  One percent was for another candidate, and 4% were undecided.

Key points:

  • Party ID.  A large partisan divide exists.  93% of Democrats who are likely to vote support Obama and 93% of Republicans who are likely to cast a ballot are behind Romney.  Romney has the backing of 46% of independent likely voters compared with 45% for Obama.  In mid-October, Romney received 48% to Obama’s 43% among independents.
  • Enthusiasm.  75% of Florida likely voters are very enthusiastic about going to the polls on Tuesday.  Looking at each candidate’s supporters, 81% of those who are for Romney and 75% of Obama’s backers express a high degree of enthusiasm.  Overall, enthusiasm in Florida has grown.  In that previous survey, 66% of likely voters expressed a high degree of enthusiasm.  Romney and Obama also enjoy a bounce in the level of enthusiasm among their respective supporters.  Previously, 71% of Romney’s supporters and 66% of Obama’s backers said they were very enthusiastic about going to the polls.
  • Intensity of support.  89% of likely voters in Florida who prefer a candidate are strongly committed to their choice.  Nine percent somewhat support their pick while less than 1% might vote differently.  One percent is unsure.  90% of likely voters who are for Romney are firmly in his camp.  This compares with 89% of likely voters who are behind Obama  who say the same.
  • Gender.  A gender gap exists.  53% of women who are likely to go to the polls support Obama compared with 45% for Romney.  However, Romney — 49% — has the advantage over Obama — 45% — among men who are likely to cast a ballot.
  • Age.  Among likely voters under the age of 30, Obama — 63% — leads Romney — 25%. The president — 53% — is also ahead of Romney — 42% — among those 30 to 44.  Looking at those 45 to 59, Obama — 50% — edges  Romney — 46%.  Romney — 53% — leads the president — 45% — among likely voters 60 and older.
  • Early voters.  63% of registered voters in Florida say they have already voted or plan to do so early.  Among likely voters, Obama — 53% — leads Romney — 46%.  However, Romney — 52% — is ahead of Obama — 40% — among likely voters who plan to go to the polls on Tuesday.

Among registered voters in Florida, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted early, Obama receives the support of 49% compared with 46% for Romney.  Two percent back another candidate, and 3% are undecided.

Table: 2012 Presidential Tossup (FL Likely Voters with Leaners and Early Voters)

Table: Enthusiasm to Vote (FL Likely Voters)

Table: Intensity of Support (FL Likely Voters)

Table: 2012 Presidential Tossup (FL Registered Voters with Leaners and Early Voters)

Half Thinks Well of Obama… Romney on the Positive Side

Among likely voters in Florida, 50% have a favorable view of President Obama while 46% have an unfavorable impression of him.  Four percent are unsure.

Last month, 52% had a positive view of Obama.  43% did not, and 5% were unsure.

When it comes to Romney’s image, more have a positive opinion of the candidate than have a negative one.  48% of likely voters in Florida have a positive impression of Romney while 45% have an unfavorable impression of the candidate.  Six percent are unsure.

When NBC News/WSJ/Marist last reported this question, 49% thought well of Romney while 44% did not.  Seven percent, at that time, were unsure.

Table: President Barack Obama Favorability (FL Likely Voters)

Table: Mitt Romney Favorability (FL Likely Voters)

Romney Edges Obama on Economy… Obama Is the Foreign Policy Candidate, Says Majority

Which candidate is perceived as the candidate who can turn around the nation’s economy?  48% of registered voters in Florida say Romney is better prepared to deal with the economy while 45% believe Obama is.  Seven percent are unsure.  Similar proportions of likely voters share these opinions.  48% of these voters statewide say Romney is more capable in this area while 46% report Obama is the candidate for the job.  Six percent are unsure.

In NBC News/WSJ/Marist’s previous survey, Florida registered voters divided.  47% thought Romney was the better candidate to deal with the economy while 45% had this impression of Obama.  Eight percent, then, were unsure.

However, among registered voters, Obama — 51% — leads Romney — 43% — on foreign policy.  Seven percent are unsure.  Among likely voters statewide, 50% say Obama is the stronger candidate in the foreign policy realm while 44% believe Romney is better versed.  Six percent are unsure.

In mid-October, 52% of registered voters said Obama was stronger on foreign policy issues.  This compares with 40% who believed Romney was the candidate for the job.  Eight percent, at that time, were unsure.

When it comes to the issue of Medicare, 51% of Florida registered voters say Obama can address this issue head-on.  This compares with 43% who think Romney will better tackle it.  Six percent are unsure.  Looking at likely voters in Florida, 51% have more confidence in Obama to deal with Medicare while 43% say Romney has a better vision for it.  Six percent are unsure.  Among likely voters who are 60 and older, Romney — 49% — leads Obama — 45%.  Six percent of these voters are unsure.

Previously, 51% of registered voters thought Obama was more capable to deal with Medicare while 39% had faith in Romney to address Medicare.  Nine percent were unsure.

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling the Economy (FL Registered Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling the Economy (FL Likely Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling Foreign Policy (FL Registered Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling Foreign Policy (FL Likely Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling Medicare (FL Registered Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling Medicare (FL Likely Voters)

Voters Divide about Obama’s Job Performance

48% of Florida registered voters approve of how President Obama is doing his job.  47% disapprove, and 5% are unsure.

When NBC News/WSJ/Marist last reported this question, 48% of registered voters applauded Obama’s job performance.  43% thought he fell short, and 8%, then, were unsure.

Table: President Obama Approval Rating in Florida (FL Registered Voters)

Turn This Nation Around, Says Narrow Majority

51% of registered voters in Florida think the country is moving in the wrong direction.  44%, however, believe it is traveling on the right road, and 6% are unsure.

In October, 50% of registered voters statewide reported the country had fallen off course.  This compares with 44% who thought its trajectory was on target.  Six percent, at the time, were unsure.

Table: Right or Wrong Direction of the Country (FL Registered Voters)

Nelson Leads Mack, 52% to 43%, Among Likely Voters

Among likely voters in Florida, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted early, Democrat Bill Nelson has the support of 52% compared with 43% for Republican Connie Mack in the race for U.S. Senate in Florida.  One percent backs another candidate, and 5% are undecided.

When NBC News/WSJ/Marist last reported this question, Nelson was ahead of Mack, 52% to 39%, among likely voters in Florida, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted absentee.  Nine percent were undecided.

Among registered voters including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted early, Nelson has the support of 52% to 42% for Mack.  One percent is for another candidate, and 5% are undecided.

Table: 2012 U.S. Senate Tossup in Florida: Nelson/Mack (FL Likely Voters with Leaners and Early Voters)

Table: 2012 U.S. Senate Tossup in Florida: Nelson/Mack (FL Registered Voters with Leaners and Early Voters)

How the Survey was Conducted

Nature of the Sample

11/3: Obama Holds Lead Over Romney in Ohio

The presidential contest is in its final days, and in the key battleground state of Ohio, President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden receive the support of 51% to 45% for Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan among Ohio likely voters, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted early.  One percent backs another candidate, and 3% are undecided.

“Both campaigns have invested heavily in Ohio and continue to do so,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion.  “As Election Day approaches, President Obama is better positioned to win the critical Buckeye State.”

Click Here for Complete November 3, 2012 Ohio NBC News/WSJ/Marist Poll Release

Click Here for Complete November 3, 2012 Ohio NBC News/WSJ/Marist Poll Tables

In NBC News/WSJ/Marist’s October 11th survey, Obama and Biden were ahead of Romney and Ryan, 51% to 45%, among likely voters statewide, including those who were undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted absentee.  One percent was for another candidate, and 4% were undecided.

Key points:

  • Party ID.  94% of Democrats who are likely to vote support President Obama.  95% of Republicans who are likely to cast a ballot are for Romney.  Among independent voters in Ohio, 48% support Romney compared with 44% for Obama.
  • Enthusiasm.  69% of likely voters in Ohio are very enthusiastic about going to the polls on Tuesday.  Looking at each candidate’s supporters, 74% of those who are behind Romney express a high degree of enthusiasm compared with 70% of those who back the president.  Enthusiasm in Ohio has increased over the past few weeks.  In the previous survey, 60% of likely voters expressed a high level of enthusiasm.  There has been a bump in the enthusiasm for, both, supporters of Obama and Romney.  In mid-October, 65% of Romney’s supporters were pumped up about casting their ballot compared with 59% of Obama’s backers.
  • Intensity of support.  88% of Ohio likely voters who prefer a candidate strongly support their choice, and 10% are somewhat behind their pick.  One percent might vote differently, and 1% is unsure.  90% of Ohio likely voters who are for Romney are firmly in his camp compared with 87% of Obama’s backers who express a similar level of commitment.
  • Gender.  Among women who are likely to go to the polls, Obama — 57% — leads Romney — 39%.  However, among men in Ohio who are likely to vote, Romney garners the support of 52% to 44% for Obama.  In NBC News/WSJ/Marist’s previous survey, Obama — 54% — led Romney — 42% — among women who are likely to vote.  At that time, men who are likely to cast a ballot divided, 47% for Obama and 47% for Romney.
  • Age.  President Obama has the support of 49% of voters under 45 years of age compared with Romney who receives 45%.  Similarly, the president has a six point lead over Romney among voters 45 and older, 51% to 45%.
  • Early voters.  35% of registered voters in Ohio say they have already voted or plan to do so early.  Among likely voters, Obama — 62% — leads Romney — 36%.  However, Romney — 52% — is ahead of Obama — 42% — among likely voters who plan to go to the polls on Tuesday.

Looking at registered voters in Ohio, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted early, 51% support Obama compared with 44% for Romney.  Two percent are behind another candidate, and 3% are undecided.

Table: 2012 Presidential Tossup (OH Likely Voters with Leaners and Early Voters)

Table: Enthusiasm to Vote (OH Likely Voters)

Table: Intensity of Support (OH Likely Voters)

Table: 2012 Presidential Tossup (OH Registered Voters with Leaners and Early Voters)

Majority Views Obama Favorably… More Divided About Romney

52% of Ohio likely voters have a positive view of the president.  45%, however, have an unfavorable opinion of him, and 4% are unsure.

In NBC News/WSJ/Marist’s previous survey, 51% of likely voters statewide had a favorable impression of the president while 44% did not.  Five percent, at that time, were unsure.

45% of likely voters think well of Romney while 48% do not.  Six percent are unsure.

In Mid-October, 44% of Ohio likely voters had a favorable opinion of him while 50% did not.  Six percent, then, were unsure.

Table: President Barack Obama Favorability (OH Likely Voters)

Table: Mitt Romney Favorability (OH Likely Voters)

Candidates Close on Economy… Obama Tops Romney on Foreign Policy

48% of Ohio registered voters think Obama will do a better job handling the nation’s economy.  45%, though, believe Romney is more capable to deal with the issue.  Seven percent are unsure.  Among likely voters in Ohio, 48% have more confidence in the president to improve the economy while 46% say Romney is the candidate for the job.  Six percent are unsure.

When NBC News/WSJ/Marist last reported this question, 47% of registered voters statewide said Obama would better tackle the economy while 45% thought Romney would do a better job.  Eight percent, at that time, were unsure.

When it comes to foreign policy, Obama — 50% — outdistances Romney — 40%.  10% are unsure.  Likely voters agree.  Among this group of voters, 50% say Obama is better suited to take on foreign policy issues.  This compares with 41% who think Romney can better handle these challenges.  Eight percent are unsure.

Last month, Obama — 50% — also had the upper hand on foreign policy over Romney — 40% — among registered voters statewide.  10%, then, were unsure.

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling the Economy (OH Registered Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling the Economy (OH Likely Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling Foreign Policy (OH Registered Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling Foreign Policy (OH Likely Voters)

Half Approve of Obama’s Job Performance… President Receives Good Reviews on Handling of Hurricane Sandy

50% of registered voters statewide approve of the president’s overall job performance.  45% disapprove, and 6% are unsure.

In mid-October, 47% gave the president a thumbs-up while 46% thought he fell short.  Six percent were unsure.

72% of registered voters approve of how President Obama is handling Hurricane Sandy.  Seven percent disapprove, and 20% are unsure.  Most Democrats — 90% — praise the president’s actions, and a majority of Republicans — 53% — do the same.  Among independents, 69% give the president high marks on his handling of this natural disaster.

Among Ohio likely voters, 73% approve of how the president dealt with this issue.  Seven percent disapprove, and 19% are unsure.

Table: President Obama Approval Rating in Ohio (OH Registered Voters)

Table: Obama’s Handling of Hurricane Sandy (OH Registered Voters)

Table: Obama’s Handling of Hurricane Sandy (OH Likely Voters)

Not Quite Half Sees Country on Wrong Path

49% of registered voters in Ohio believe the nation is moving in the wrong direction while 45% think it is traveling in the right one.  Six percent are unsure.

Previously, 51% of Ohio registered voters thought the country was on the wrong path while 44% said it was on the proper course.  Five percent were unsure.

Table: Right or Wrong Direction of the Country (OH Registered Voters)

U.S. Senate Race Closer, but Brown Still in Front

In the U.S. Senate race in Ohio, 50% of likely voters statewide, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted early, support Sherrod Brown.  This compares with 45% who back Josh Mandel.  One percent is for another candidate, and 4% are undecided.

When NBC News/WSJ/Marist last reported this question, Brown — 52% — led Mandel — 41% — among likely voters, including those who were undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted absentee.  One percent was for another candidate, and 6% were undecided.

Among registered voters in Ohio, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted early, 49% support Brown compared with 44% for Mandel.  One percent backs another candidate, and 5% are undecided.

Table: 2012 U.S. Senate Tossup in Ohio: Brown/Mandel (OH Likely Voters with Leaners and Early Voters)

Table: 2012 U.S. Senate Tossup in Ohio: Brown/Mandel (OH Registered Voters with Leaners and Early Voters)

How the Survey was Conducted

Nature of the Sample

11/1: Tight Contest in New Hampshire

In New Hampshire, President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden — 49% — are closely matched with Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan — 47% — among likely voters statewide, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted absentee.  One percent is behind another candidate, and 3% are undecided.

“The battle for New Hampshire’s four electoral votes has gotten very close,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion.  “The president is not getting anywhere near what he got four years ago when he carried the state by nine points.”

Click Here for Complete November 1, 2012 New Hampshire NBC News/WSJ/Marist Poll Release

Click Here for Complete November 1, 2012 New Hampshire NBC News/WSJ/Marist Poll Tables

When NBC News/WSJ/Marist last reported this question at the end of September, Obama and Biden had the support of 51% of likely voters, including those who were undecided yet leaning toward a candidate.  Romney and Ryan had the backing of 44%.  One percent was for another candidate, and 4%, at that time, were undecided.

Key points:

  • Party ID.  97% of likely voters who are Democrats support Obama.  This compares with 94% of Republicans likely to cast a ballot who are for Romney.  Independents who are likely to vote divide.  Romney receives the support of 47% compared with 46% for Obama.  Last month, Obama led Romney among this key group, 53% to 40%.
  • Enthusiasm.  66% of likely voters are very enthusiastic about casting a ballot.  68% of Obama’s supporters and 71% of Romney’s backers express a high degree of enthusiasm.  In last month’s survey, 59% of likely voters were very enthusiastic about voting.
  • Intensity of support.  91% of likely voters who support a candidate strongly back their choice.  Eight percent are somewhat behind their pick, and 1% might vote differently.  Looking at each candidate’s supporters.  91% of Romney’s backers are firmly committed to him while 90% of those behind Obama say the same.  Last month, 86% of likely voters in New Hampshire who preferred a candidate reported they would not waver in their support.  At that time, 86% of Obama’s supporters and 85% of Romney’s backers were firmly in their candidate’s camp.
  • Gender.  Obama — 56% — leads Romney — 40% — among New Hampshire likely voters who are women.  Among men who are likely to cast a ballot, Romney — 53% — is ahead of Obama — 42%.
  • Early voters.  10% of registered voters in New Hampshire have already voted or plan to do so before Election Day.  Among this group, 56% support Obama compared with 42% for Romney.  Likely voters who plan to go to the polls on Election Day divide.  48% back Romney, and 47% support Obama.

Among registered voters in New Hampshire, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted absentee, 49% support Obama and Biden compared with 46% for Romney and Ryan.  One percent throws their support behind another candidate, and 4% are undecided.

Table: 2012 Presidential Tossup (NH Likely Voters with Leaners and Absentee)

Table: Enthusiasm to Vote (NH Likely Voters)

Table: Intensity of Support (NH Likely Voters)

Table: 2012 Presidential Tossup (NH Registered Voters with Leaners and Absentee)

Half Views Obama Favorably…Improved Reviews for Romney

50% of likely voters in New Hampshire have a favorable impression of President Obama.  46% have an unfavorable view of him, and 4% are unsure.

Last month, 54% thought well of the president while 43% did not.  Three percent, at that time, were unsure.

For Romney, 49% of New Hampshire likely voters have a positive opinion of him while 46% do not.  Six percent are unsure.

At the end of September, 43% of likely voters statewide had a favorable view of Romney.  52% of likely voters had an unfavorable perception of the candidate, and 5% were unsure.

Table: President Barack Obama Favorability (NH Likely Voters)

Table: Mitt Romney Favorability (NH Likely Voters)

Romney Edges Obama on Economy, Obama Still Takes Top Spot on Foreign Policy

Which candidate will better handle the U.S. economy?  48% of registered voters in New Hampshire believe Romney is the stronger candidate on the nation’s economy compared with 45% who view Obama as more capable on the issue.  Six percent are unsure.  Among likely voters, 49% think Romney has the upper hand on the issue of the economy while 46% think Obama is better able to turn things around.  Five percent are unsure.

In September, 49% of New Hampshire registered voters said Obama was better prepared to handle the U.S. economy while 45% thought Romney was.  Seven percent, at that time, were unsure.

When it comes to foreign policy, 51% of registered voters think Obama is the stronger candidate compared with 42% who believe Romney is.  Seven percent are unsure.  Among likely voters in New Hampshire, Obama — 51% — outpaces Romney — 43% — in the foreign policy realm.  Six percent are unsure.

In NBC News/WSJ/Marist’s previous survey, 54% of registered voters thought Obama was more capable on foreign policy.  39% had this opinion of Romney, and 7% were unsure.

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling the Economy (NH Registered Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling the Economy (NH Likely Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling Foreign Policy (NH Registered Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling Foreign Policy (NH Likely Voters)

Voters Divide Over Obama’s Job Performance

Among registered voters in New Hampshire, 48% approve of the job the president is doing in office.  47% disapprove, and 5% are unsure.

In September, 50% of registered voters statewide applauded Obama’s job performance.  45% thought he missed the mark, and 5%, then, were unsure.

Table: President Obama Approval Rating in New Hampshire (NH Registered Voters)

A Nation Off Course, Says Majority

53% of registered voters in New Hampshire believe the nation is moving in the wrong direction.  41% believe it is on the proper path, and 6% are unsure.

At the end of September, 51% said the country was off track while 44% thought it was on the right road.  At that time, 6% were unsure.

Table: Right or Wrong Direction of the Country (NH Registered Voters)

Hassan Ahead of Lamontagne by 5 Points in NH Governor’s Race

In the race for governor in New Hampshire, Democrat Maggie Hassan — 49% — and Republican Ovide Lamontagne — 44% — are in a competitive contest among likely voters, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted absentee.  One percent is for another candidate, and 6% are undecided.

Last month, 47% of likely voters, including those who were undecided yet leaning toward a candidate, supported Hassan, and 45% were for Lamontagne.  One percent backed another candidate, and 7% were undecided.

Among registered voters, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and voted absentee, Hassan has the support of 49% to 43% for Lamontagne.  One percent is behind another candidate, and 7% are undecided.

Table: 2012 New Hampshire Governor’s Race: Lamontagne/Hassan (NH Likely Voters with Leaners and Absentee)

Table: 2012 New Hampshire Governor’s Race: Lamontagne/Hassan (NH Registered Voters with Leaners and Absentee)

How the Survey was Conducted

Nature of the Sample

11/1: Obama Leads Romney in Iowa

With the clock counting down to Election Day, President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden receive the support of 50% of likely voters in Iowa, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted absentee, to 44% for Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan.  Two percent support another candidate, and 4% are undecided.

“President Obama’s lead in Iowa is due to those who have voted early or plan to do so, including many independents,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion.  “Obama has a 21 point lead among Independent voters who plan to cast an early ballot while Romney is up 9 points among independents who plan to vote on Election Day.”

Click Here for Complete November 1, 2012 Iowa NBC News/WSJ/Marist Poll Release

Click Here for Complete November 1, 2012 Iowa NBC News/WSJ/Marist Poll Tables

When NBC News/WSJ/Marist reported this question earlier this month, 51% of likely voters, including those who were undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted absentee, supported Obama and Biden while 43% backed Romney and Ryan.  Two percent were for another candidate, and 4% were undecided.

Key points:

  • Party ID.  94% of Democrats who are likely to vote are behind the president while 91% of Republicans who are likely to cast a ballot are for Romney.  Among likely independent voters, 47% support Obama compared with 39% for Romney.
  • Enthusiasm.  60% of likely voters are very enthusiastic about voting.  65% of likely voters who are Romney supporters are very enthusiastic to vote compared with 61% of those who back Obama.  Since NBC News/WSJ/Marist’s previous survey, enthusiasm is up slightly.  At that time, 55% of likely voters were very enthusiastic.  While there has been little change in the enthusiasm of Romney’s backers — 64%, there has been an increase among Obama’s backers.  In that last survey, 53% of Obama’s supporters said they were very enthusiastic.
  • Intensity of support.  88% of likely voters who support a candidate strongly support their choice.  12% are somewhat behind their pick while less than 1% might vote differently.  Less than 1% is unsure.  Among likely voters who support Obama, 86% are firmly committed to him.  This compares with 89% of Romney’s backers who say they stand strong behind their candidate.
  • Gender.  56% of women who are likely to go to the polls support Obama compared with 40% for Romney.  Among men who are likely to vote, Romney — 48% — edges Obama — 44%.
  • Age.  The president — 61% — leads Romney — 30% — among likely voters under the age of 30.  48% of likely voters 30 to 44 support Obama compared with 43% for Romney.  Those 45 to 59 divide, 49% for Obama, and 47% for Romney.  Obama — 48% — is neck and neck with Romney — 47% — among likely voters 60 and older.
  • Early voters.  45% of registered voters in Iowa have already voted or plan to do so before Election Day.  Among likely voters who have cast their ballot or plan to do so early, Obama — 62% — leads Romney — 35%.  Among those who plan to vote on Election Day, Romney — 55% — has the advantage over Obama — 35%.

Looking at registered voters, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted absentee, Obama and Biden have 49% compared with 43% for Romney and Ryan.  Two percent support another candidate, and 6% are undecided.

Table: 2012 Presidential Tossup (IA Likely Voters with Leaners and Absentee)

Table: Enthusiasm to Vote (IA Likely Voters)

Table: Intensity of Support (IA Likely Voters)

Table: 2012 Presidential Tossup (IA Registered Voters with Leaners and Absentee)

Majority Views Obama Favorably… Romney Still More Negative than Positive

52% of likely voters in Iowa have a favorable view of President Obama.  This compares with 44% who have an unfavorable one.  Five percent are unsure.

Earlier this month, 54% of likely voters thought well of the president while 43% did not.  Three percent were unsure.

Romney’s favorability is still upside down.  43% have a positive view of him while 49% have an unfavorable impression of him.  Eight percent are unsure.

In NBC News/WSJ/Marist’s previous survey, 44% of likely voters statewide had a favorable opinion of Romney while 51% had an unfavorable one.  Five percent, at that time, were unsure.

Table: President Barack Obama Favorability (IA Likely Voters)

Table: Mitt Romney Favorability (IA Likely Voters)

Obama and Romney Neck and Neck on Economy…Obama Tops on Foreign Policy

When it comes to the nation’s economy, 44% of registered voters in Iowa think Obama will do a better job handling the economy, and the same proportion — 44% — believes Romney is more capable to handle the issue.  11% are unsure.  Among likely voters in Iowa, 45% say Obama is better suited to turn around the country’s economy, and 45% think Romney is the candidate for the job.  10% are unsure.

Earlier in October, 46% of Iowa registered voters statewide reported Obama was the stronger candidate on the economy compared with 46% who had this view of Romney. At that time, 9% were unsure.

However, Obama — 50% — outperforms Romney — 38% — among registered voters on foreign policy.  11% are unsure.  Similar proportions of likely voters agree.  51% think Obama is more capable to deal with foreign policy issues while 39% say Romney is.  10% are unsure.

Earlier this month, Obama — 51% — had the advantage over Romney — 39% — among registered voters in Iowa.  At that time, 11% were unsure.

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling the Economy (IA Registered Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling the Economy (IA Likely Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling Foreign Policy (IA Registered Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling Foreign Policy (IA Likely Voters)

Nearly Half Approve of Obama’s Job Performance

Among Iowa registered voters, 48% approve of the president’s job performance while 45% disapprove.  Seven percent are unsure.

Earlier this month, 50% gave Obama high marks while 43% thought he fell short.  Six percent were unsure.

Table: President Obama Approval Rating in Iowa (IA Registered Voters)

A Nation Off Track, Says Half

50% of Iowa registered voters think the country is moving in the wrong direction while 44% say it is traveling in the right one.  Six percent are unsure.

Previously, 47% of registered voters in Iowa thought the country’s compass was broken while 47% believed the nation’s trajectory was on target.  At that time, 6% were unsure.

Table: Right or Wrong Direction of the Country (IA Registered Voters)

How the Survey was Conducted

Nature of the Sample

 

11/1: Competitive Contest in Wisconsin

Among likely voters in Wisconsin, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted absentee, President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden receive the support of 49% to 46% for Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan.  Two percent back another candidate, and 3% are undecided.

“President Obama is advantaged by voters who plan to vote early,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion.  “But, Romney benefits from greater enthusiasm among his supporters.”

Click Here for Complete November 1, 2012 Wisconsin NBC News/WSJ/Marist Poll Release

Click Here for Complete November 1, 2012 Wisconsin NBC News/WSJ/Marist Poll Tables

In NBC News/WSJ/Marist’s previous survey conducted in Wisconsin earlier this month, Obama and Biden — 51% — were ahead of Romney and Ryan — 45% — among Wisconsin likely voters, including those who were undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted absentee.  One percent supported another candidate, and only 3%, at that time, were undecided.

Key points:

  • Party ID.  There is a wide partisan divide.  93% of likely Democratic voters are behind the president while 97% of Republicans who are likely to vote back Romney.  Among independent likely voters, 48% support Obama compared with 44% for Romney.
  • Enthusiasm.  66% of likely voters in Wisconsin are very enthusiastic about casting their ballot.  Among Romney’s supporters, 74% express a high degree of enthusiasm compared with 65% of Obama’s backers.  Overall, enthusiasm has inched up among likely voters in Wisconsin.  Earlier this month, 62% of likely voters expressed a high degree of enthusiasm.
  • Intensity of support.  89% of likely voters who prefer a candidate are firmly committed to their choice.  Nine percent somewhat support their pick, and 1% might vote differently come Election Day.  Looking at each candidate’s supporters, 88% of likely voters who support Obama say they will not waver in their support.  This compares with 91% of Romney’s backers who say the same.
  • Gender.  There is a gender gap.  55% of women, who are likely to vote, support Obama compared with 41% for Romney.  Among men likely to cast a ballot, 51% back Romney while 43% are for the president.
  • Age.  Young voters favor the president.  63% of likely voters in Wisconsin under the age of 30 rally for Obama while 31% tout Romney.  Those 30 to 44 divide, 48% for Obama and 47% for Romney.  Looking at voters 45 to 59, Romney leads 51% to 45% for Obama.  Among likely voters 60 and older, Obama has 51% to 46% for Romney.
  • Early voters.  25% of registered voters in Wisconsin have either already voted or plan to do so before Election Day.  Obama — 59% — leads Romney — 39% — among likely voters who have cast their ballot or plan to do so early.  Among likely voters who plan to go to the polls next Tuesday, Romney has the support of 50% to 45% for Obama.

Among registered voters in Wisconsin, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted absentee, Obama and Biden receive 49%.  Romney and Ryan garner 45%.  Two percent support another candidate, and 4% are undecided.

Table: 2012 Presidential Tossup (WI Likely Voters with Leaners and Absentee)

Table: Enthusiasm to Vote (WI Likely Voters)

Table: Intensity of Support (WI Likely Voters)

Table: 2012 Presidential Tossup (WI Registered Voters with Leaners and Absentee)

Majority Perceives Obama Favorably… Divide about Romney

A majority of likely Wisconsin voters — 53% — have a favorable opinion of President Obama.  44% have an unfavorable one, and 4% are unsure.

This is unchanged from earlier this month.  53%, at that time, had a positive impression of Obama, and 44% did not.  Three percent were unsure.

Looking at Romney’s favorability rating, 47% think well of him while 47% do not.  Seven percent are unsure.

Voters’ impressions of Romney are also unchanged from NBC News/WSJ/Marist’s previous survey.  47% of likely voters in Wisconsin, then, had a favorable opinion of Romney while the same proportion — 47% — had an unfavorable view of him.  Six percent, at that time, were unsure.

Table: President Barack Obama Favorability (WI Likely Voters)

Table: Mitt Romney Favorability (WI Likely Voters)

Obama and Romney Vie for Top Spot on Economy… Obama Outpaces Romney on Foreign Policy

Among Wisconsin registered voters, 47% think Obama is better prepared to handle the nation’s economy.  This compares with 46% who believe Romney is better suited for the job.  Six percent are unsure.  Similar proportions of likely voters share these views.  47% report Obama is the stronger candidate on the economy while the same proportion, 47%, say Romney is more capable in this area.  Six percent are unsure.

Two weeks ago, 47% of registered voters in Wisconsin thought Obama had a better chance of turning the economy around while 46% had this view of Romney.  Seven percent were unsure.

When it comes to foreign policy, Obama — 52% — has the advantage over Romney — 40% — among registered voters statewide.  Eight percent are unsure.  Among likely voters in Wisconsin, 52% say Obama is better suited to take on foreign policy issues.  41% disagree and think Romney is more capable on this issue.  Seven percent are unsure.

Earlier this month, 51% of registered voters thought Obama would be better than Romney — 42% — in the foreign policy sphere.  At that time, 7% were unsure.

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling the Economy (WI Registered Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling the Economy (WI Likely Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling Foreign Policy (WI Registered Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling Foreign Policy (WI Likely Voters)

Nearly Half Approve of Obama’s Job Performance

49% of registered voters statewide approve of how President Obama is doing his job.  44% disapprove and 6% are unsure.

In NBC News/WSJ/Marist’s previous survey in Wisconsin, 49% gave the president a thumbs-up.  45% reported Obama’s performance was subpar, and 5% were unsure.

Table: President Obama Approval Rating in Wisconsin (WI Registered Voters)

Plurality Think New Course Needed for the Nation

48% of Wisconsin registered voters think the country is moving in the wrong direction.  This compares with 45% who believe it is traveling in the right one.  Seven percent are unsure.

Two weeks ago, 52% of Wisconsin registered voters thought the nation needed a new path while 44% said its trajectory was on target.  At that time, 4% were unsure.

Table: Right or Wrong Direction of the Country (WI Registered Voters)

Baldwin and Thompson in Close Contest for U.S. Senate in Wisconsin

Among Wisconsin likely voters, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted absentee, Democrat Tammy Baldwin has the support of 48% to 47% for Republican Tommy Thompson.  One percent is behind another candidate, and 4% are undecided.

Earlier this month, Baldwin had 49% to 45% for Thompson among likely voters, including those who were undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted absentee.  One percent supported another candidate, and 5% were undecided.

Among registered voters, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted absentee, 48% back Baldwin compared with 46% for Thompson.  One percent is behind another candidate, and 5% are undecided.

Table: 2012 U.S. Senate Tossup in Wisconsin: Baldwin/Thompson (WI Likely Voters with Leaners and Absentee)

Table: 2012 U.S. Senate Tossup in Wisconsin: Baldwin/Thompson (WI Registered Voters with Leaners and Absentee)

How the Survey was Conducted

Nature of the Sample

10/25: Obama Edges Romney in Nevada

Among Nevada likely voters, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted early or by absentee, President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden receive 50% to 47% for Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan.  One percent backs another candidate, and 2% are undecided.

“As Election Day approaches, both candidates are experiencing a surge in enthusiasm among their supporters,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion.  “Romney’s supporters are more enthusiastic about voting than Obama’s which keeps Nevada competitive.”

Click Here for Complete October 25, 2012 Nevada NBC News/WSJ/Marist Poll Release

Click Here for Complete October 25, 2012 Nevada NBC News/WSJ/Marist Poll Tables

When NBC News/WSJ/Marist last reported this question in September, 49% of likely voters in Nevada, including those who were undecided yet leaning toward a candidate, were behind  Obama and Biden while 47% were for Romney and Ryan.  One percent threw their support behind another candidate, and 3% were undecided.

Key points:

  • Party ID.  94% of Democrats who are likely to vote support Obama while 90% of Republicans who are likely to go to the polls back Romney.  Among independent likely voters, 55% favor Romney compared with 40% for Obama.
  • Enthusiasm.  74% of likely voters are very enthusiastic about participating on Election Day.  Among Romney’s supporters, 80% say they are very enthusiastic.  74% of likely voters who are behind President Obama have a similar level of enthusiasm.  Both candidates have experienced a bump in the enthusiasm of their supporters, but Romney has the advantage.  In September, 62% of Obama’s backers and 65% of those behind Romney expressed a high degree of enthusiasm.
  • Intensity of support.  88% of Nevada likely voters strongly support their choice of candidate.  11% somewhat support their pick, and 1% may vote differently.  One percent is unsure.  Looking at each candidate’s supporters, 90% of likely voters who back Obama are strongly committed to him while 86% of those behind Romney are firmly entrenched in his camp.
  • Gender.  The gender gap has narrowed.  52% of women who are likely to vote rally for the president while 46% back Romney.  Looking at men who are likely to cast a ballot, 48% are for Obama while 47% are behind Romney.  In NBC News/WSJ/Marist’s September survey, Obama led Romney among women by 16 points, 57% to 41%.  Romney was ahead of Obama among men, at that time, by 11 points, 53% to 42%.
  • Age.  Young voters favor the president.  70% of Nevada likely voters who are under 30 years old support Obama compared with 28% for Romney.  Among those 30 to 44, Obama has 54% to 41% for Romney.  Romney — 49% — is neck and neck with Obama — 48% — among likely voters 45 to 59.  Romney — 52% — leads Obama — 46% — among likely voters who are 60 and older.
  • Early voters.  71% of likely voters in Nevada have voted or plan to do so before Election Day.  In 2008, 67% of the Nevada electorate voted early.  Obama — 53% — leads Romney — 45% — among likely voters who have cast their ballot or plan to do so before Election Day.  Romney — 58% — outpaces Obama — 36% — among likely voters who plan to go to the polls on Election Day.  Obama has a 15 point advantage among voters who have not decided whether to vote early or on Election Day, 53% to 38%.

Among Nevada registered voters, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted early, Obama has the support of 51% while Romney garners 45%.  One percent backs another candidate, and 3% are undecided.

Table: 2012 Presidential Tossup (NV Likely Voters with Leaners and Early Voters)

Table: Enthusiasm to Vote (NV Likely Voters)

Table: Intensity of Support (NV Likely Voters)

Table: 2012 Presidential Tossup (NV Registered Voters with Leaners and Early Voters)

Obama Perceived Winner of Third Debate, but Most Voters Already Made Their Choice

46% of likely voters in Nevada say the president was the victor of Monday night’s debate on foreign policy.  25%, however, think Romney came out on top.  15% do not give the advantage to either candidate, and 14% are unsure.

Did the debate make a difference?  96% of likely voters statewide say they picked their candidate before the debate while just 4% say they did so after the matchup.

When it comes to the method by which registered voters found out about the debate, 60% watched it firsthand.  22% followed its news coverage while 18% neither tuned in for the debate nor saw news coverage about it.

Table: Winner of the Final Presidential Debate (NV Likely Voters)

Table: Candidate Selection Made Before or After Debate (NV Likely Voters)

Table: Information Source for First Presidential Debate (NV Registered Voters)

Majority Perceives Obama Favorably, Divides about Romney

52% of likely voters in Nevada have a favorable impression of President Obama.  However, 44% have an unfavorable one, and 4% are unsure.

In NBC News/WSJ/Marist’s September survey in the state, 50% of Nevada likely voters had a positive view of the president while 47% had an unfavorable one.  Three percent, at the time,   were unsure.

When it comes to Romney’s favorability rating, 48% have a favorable opinion of him while 46% have an unfavorable impression of him.  Six percent are unsure.

In September, 45% thought well of Romney while 48% had an unfavorable impression of him.  Seven percent were unsure.

Table: President Barack Obama Favorability (NV Likely Voters)

Table: Mitt Romney Favorability (NV Likely Voters)

Obama and Romney Battle on Economy…Foreign Policy Goes to Obama

Which candidate will do a better job handling the U.S. economy?  48% of registered voters in Nevada think Obama will compared with 47% who say Romney is the candidate for the job.  Five percent are unsure.  Looking at likely voters in the state, 49% believe Romney is more likely to turn around the nation’s economy while 46% say Obama is the stronger candidate.  Five percent are unsure.

When NBC News/WSJ/Marist last reported this question in September, 48% of registered voters believed Obama was more capable to deal with the economy while 46% thought Romney was.  Six percent, at that time, were unsure.

In the foreign policy sphere, Obama — 52% — leads Romney — 43% — among Nevada registered voters.  Six percent are unsure.  Likely voters in the state agree.  51% believe Obama is the stronger candidate on foreign policy while 44% say Romney is.  Five percent are unsure.

Last month, 50% of registered voters believed Obama was more capable to deal with this policy area while 43% said Romney was better prepared.  Seven percent, then, were unsure.

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling the Economy (NV Registered Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling the Economy (NV Likely Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling Foreign Policy (NV Registered Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling Foreign Policy (NV Likely Voters)

Bounce in Obama’s Approval Rating in Nevada

51% of registered voters in Nevada approve of the job President Obama is doing in office while 45% do not.  Four percent are unsure.

In NBC News/WSJ/Marist’s previous survey, 47% of registered voters statewide gave the president a thumbs-up.  47% said he missed the mark, and 6% were unsure.

Table: President Obama Approval Rating in Nevada (NV Registered Voters)

Nation Needs a New Path, Say 50%

Half of Nevada registered voters think the country is moving in the wrong direction.  47% say it is traveling in the right one, and 3% are unsure.

More registered voters in Nevada are optimistic about the future of the country than in September.  At that time, 55% believed the nation’s compass was broken while 41% reported its trajectory was on target.  Four percent were unsure.

Table: Right or Wrong Direction of the Country (NV Registered Voters)

Heller Edges Berkley in U.S. Senate Race in Nevada

Republican incumbent Dean Heller receives 48% to 45% for Democrat Shelley Berkley in the race for U.S. Senate in Nevada among likely voters, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted early or by absentee.  Two percent are for another candidate, and 6% are undecided.

In NBC News/WSJ/Marist’s September survey, 49% of likely voters including those who were undecided yet leaning toward a candidate were for Heller compared with 43% for Berkley.  One percent supported another candidate, and 6% were undecided.

Among Nevada registered voters, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward candidate and those who voted early, Heller — 46% — is tied with Berkley — 46%.  One percent backs another candidate, and 7% are undecided.

Table: 2012 U.S. Senate Tossup in Nevada: Berkley/Heller (NV Likely Voters with Leaners and Early Voters)

Table: 2012 U.S. Senate Tossup in Nevada: Berkley/Heller (NV Registered Voters with Leaners and Early Voters)

How the Survey was Conducted

Nature of the Sample

10/25: Obama and Romney Tied in Colorado

In the presidential contest in Colorado, President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden receive the support of 48% of likely voters, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted early or by absentee, compared with the same proportion — 48% — for Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan.  Two percent are behind another candidate, and 2% are undecided.

“Until Barack Obama in 2008, the only Democrat to carry Colorado since 1964 was Bill Clinton,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion.  “But, Colorado is much different terrain for Obama this time than when he carried it by nine points four years ago.”

Click Here for Complete October 25, 2012 Colorado NBC News/WSJ/Marist Poll Release

Click Here for Complete October 25, 2012 Colorado NBC News/WSJ/Marist Poll Tables

When NBC News/WSJ/Marist last reported this question in September, Obama and Biden had the support of 50% of likely voters in Colorado, including those who were undecided yet leaning toward a candidate, compared with 45% for Romney and Ryan.  One percent backed another candidate, and 4% were undecided.

Key points:

  • Party ID.  A partisan divide exists.  96% of Democrats who are likely to vote support Obama, and 96% of Republicans likely to cast a ballot are for Romney.  Among likely independent voters, 46% support Romney compared with 45% for Obama.  Romney has gained ground among independent voters.  Last month, 50% of these voters supported Obama while 39% were for Romney.
  • Enthusiasm.  65% of likely voters are very enthusiastic about voting next month.  Looking at each candidate’s supporters, 68% of likely voters who support Romney express a high degree of enthusiasm compared with 66% of likely voters behind Obama.  Voter enthusiasm has increased in Colorado.  59% of likely voters said they were very enthusiastic to cast their ballot in NBC News/WSJ/Marist’s September survey.  At that time, 64% of Romney’s backers expressed a high level of enthusiasm while 59% of those behind Obama said the same.
  • Intensity of support.  87% of Colorado likely voters strongly support their choice of candidate.  12% are somewhat behind their pick, and 1% might vote differently.  Less than 1% is unsure.  Among likely voters who back the president, 90% are firmly committed to him.  85% of those who are behind Romney say their support will not waver.
  • Gender.  A gender gap exists.  52% of women who are likely to vote support Obama while 45% favor Romney.  Among men who are likely to go to the polls, 51% are behind Romney compared with 43% who support Obama.
  • Age.  Obama — 59% — has the advantage over Romney — 36% — among likely voters under 30 years old.  Looking at those 30 to 44, 48% support Romney compared with 45% for Obama.  Among Colorado likely voters 45 to 59, Romney receives 51% of likely voters’ support while Obama has 44%.  Among Colorado likely voters 60 and older, Romney has 50% compared with 48% for Obama.
  • Early voters.  78% of the likely voters in Colorado have already voted or plan to do so before Election Day a similar proportion to those who voted early in 2008.  Romney — 49% — is neck and neck with Obama — 48% among likely voters who have cast their ballot or plan to do so early.  Romney — 56% — leads Obama — 39% — among likely voters who plan to go to the polls on Election Day.  Obama — 62% — outdistances Romney — 26% — among voters who have yet to decide whether or not to vote early.

Among registered voters in Colorado, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted early, Obama and Biden receive the support of 48% to 47% for Romney and Ryan.  Two percent support another candidate, and 3% are undecided.

Table: 2012 Presidential Tossup (CO Likely Voters with Leaners and Early Voters)

Table: Enthusiasm to Vote (CO Likely Voters)

Table: Intensity of Support (CO Likely Voters)

Table: 2012 Presidential Tossup (CO Registered Voters with Leaners and Early Voters)

Obama Debate Victor, Says Plurality, but Did It Matter?

Which candidate won Monday night’s foreign policy debate?  46% of likely voters in Colorado say Obama outperformed Romney.  This compares with 25% who think Romney was the winner.  18% of likely voters say neither candidate had the upper hand, and 12% are unsure.

Regardless of the winner, Monday’s foreign policy debate did not change many minds.  95% of Colorado likely voters selected their candidate before the debate while just 5% did so following it.  One percent is unsure.

63% of registered voters in the state watched the debate live while 20% followed the news coverage about it afterwards.  17% neither watched the matchup nor the news reports about it.

Table: Winner of the Final Presidential Debate (CO Likely Voters)

Table: Candidate Selection Made Before or After Debate (CO Likely Voters)

Table: Information Source for First Presidential Debate (CO Registered Voters)

Obama Viewed Favorably by Majority…Romney Receives Mixed Reviews

Among Colorado likely voters, 51% have a favorable view of President Barack Obama.  46% perceive him unfavorably, and 2% are unsure.

When NBC News/WSJ/Marist last reported this question in September, 51% of Colorado likely voters thought well of the president while 45% had an unfavorable view of him.  Four percent, at the time, were unsure.

When it comes to Romney, 48% have a favorable opinion of the candidate while 47% do not.  Five percent are unsure.

Romney’s image has improved slightly in Colorado.  In NBC News/WSJ/Marist’s September survey, 43% had a positive view of Romney while 50% had an unfavorable one.  Six percent, then, were unsure.

Table: President Barack Obama Favorability (CO Likely Voters)

Table: Mitt Romney Favorability (CO Likely Voters)

Obama and Romney Vie for Top Spot on Economy… Obama Bests Romney on Foreign Policy

48% of registered voters in Colorado think Romney is the stronger candidate on the economy.  47% disagree and believe Obama is.  Six percent are unsure.  Last month, 48% of Colorado registered voters thought Obama was the stronger candidate on the economy while 45% believed Romney was better prepared to handle the issue.  Seven percent, at that time, were unsure.

Among likely voters, 49% now say Romney is more capable to transform the nation’s economy while 46% have this opinion of Obama.  Five percent are unsure.  In September, 48% of likely voters thought Obama was better for the economy compared with 46% who had this view of Romney.  Six percent were unsure.

When it comes to foreign policy, it’s a different ball game.  Among registered voters in Colorado, 52% think Obama can better address these issues compared with 43% who have this view of Romney.  Five percent are unsure.  Looking at likely voters statewide, 51% say Obama will do a better job handling this policy area compared with 44% who think Romney will excel.  Five percent are unsure.

In NBC News/WSJ/Marist’s previous poll, 51% of registered voters perceived Obama to be better versed in foreign policy while 40% said Romney had the advantage.  One in ten — 10% — was unsure.  Likely voters agreed.  51% of likely voters saw Obama as more capable on foreign policy compared with 41% who had this view of Romney.  Eight percent, at that time, were unsure.

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling the Economy (CO Registered Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling the Economy (CO Likely Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling Foreign Policy (CO Registered Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling Foreign Policy (CO Likely Voters)

Voters Divide about Obama’s Job Performance

49% of registered voters in Colorado approve of how the president is doing in office.  This compares with 47% who disapprove.  Four percent are unsure.

In September, 47% gave Obama high marks while the same proportion — 47% — said he fell short.  Six percent, then, were unsure.

Table: President Obama Approval Rating in Colorado (CO Registered Voters)

A Nation Off the Rails, Says Majority

51% of Colorado registered voters believe the nation is moving in the wrong direction while 46% believe it is on course.  Three percent are unsure.

When NBC News/WSJ/Marist last reported this question, 53% thought the country needed a new trajectory while 41% believed it should stay the course.  Six percent were unsure.

Table: Right or Wrong Direction of the Country (CO Registered Voters)

How the Survey was Conducted

Nature of the Sample

10/18: Obama Leads Romney in Iowa

In the presidential contest in Iowa, 51% of likely voters, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted absentee, support President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden.  43% are for Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan.  Two percent back another candidate, and 4% are undecided.

“When likely voters intend to cast their ballot tells us a lot about what is happening in Iowa,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion.  “Those who have already voted are breaking for Obama by more than two to one.  In contrast, Romney leads by double digits with those who will vote on Election Day.”

Click Here for Complete October 18, 2012 Iowa NBC News/WSJ/Marist Poll Release

Click Here for Complete October 18, 2012 Iowa NBC News/WSJ/Marist Poll Tables

In NBC News/WSJ/Marist’s September survey in Iowa, 50% of likely voters in Iowa, including those who were undecided yet leaning toward a candidate, were behind Obama and Biden while 42% supported Romney and Ryan.  Only 1% was behind another candidate, and 7%, at that time, were undecided.

Key points:

  • Debate difference?  The presidential debate on Tuesday night has done little to change the landscape of the presidential election in Iowa.  Only 3% of likely voters say they made up their mind after the debate.  Prior to the debate, 52% of likely voters supported the president while 43% backed Romney.  One percent was behind another candidate, and 4% were undecided.  Following the debate, on Wednesday, 51% of likely voters are behind the president while 43% support Romney.  Two percent are for another candidate, and 4% are undecided.
  • Party ID.  Most Democrats who are likely to vote — 96% — favor the president while most Republicans who are likely to cast a ballot — 92% — back Romney.  Among independent likely voters, 49% rally for the president while 38% are for Romney.
  • Enthusiasm.  55% of Iowa likely voters are very enthusiastic about voting next month.  Romney’s backers — 64% — are very enthusiastic about going to the polls compared with 53% of Obama’s supporters.  Compared with NBC News/WSJ/Marist’s September survey, there has been an increase in the proportion of  likely voters who back Romney who also express a high degree of enthusiasm.  55% felt this way in the previous poll.  There has been little change among Obama’s supporters.  In September, 55% of the president’s supporters had a similar level of enthusiasm.
  • Intensity of support.  86% of Iowa likely voters are strongly committed to their choice of candidate.  13% somewhat support their pick while 1% may vote differently.  Less than 1% is unsure.  86% of Romney’s supporters are firmly in his camp while 85% of Obama’s backers strongly support him.  In September, 80% of likely voters behind Romney and 82% of Obama’s supporters reported a high level of commitment to their candidate.
  • Gender.  A gender gap exists.  57% of likely voters who are women are behind Obama compared with 39% who back Romney.  Among men who are likely to cast a ballot, Romney edges Obama — 48% to 45%.
  • Age.  Young voters favor the president.  67% of likely voters under the age of thirty support the president.  This compares with 23% who are for Romney.  Among Iowa likely voters 30 to 44, 48% back Obama while 47% are for Romney.  Among likely voters between 45 and 59, Obama has the support of 51% compared with 43% for Romney.  Obama and Romney are in a close contest — 49% to 47% — among voters who are 60 and older and likely to cast a ballot.
  • Already voted.  34% of likely voters in Iowa indicate they have already cast their ballot. Obama leads Romney — 67% to 32% — among these voters.  Romney leads Obama — 54% to 39% — among likely voters who plan to cast their ballot on Election Day.

Looking at registered voters, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted absentee, Obama has the support of 50% compared with 43% who favor Romney.  Two percent back another candidate, and 5% are undecided.

Table: 2012 Presidential Tossup (IA Likely Voters with Leaners and Absentee)

Table: Enthusiasm to Vote (IA Likely Voters)

Table: Intensity of Support (IA Likely Voters)

Table: 2012 Presidential Tossup (IA Registered Voters with Leaners and Absentee)

Impact of the Debate

95% of likely voters say they decided on a candidate before Tuesday night’s debate.  Three percent made their choice after the matchup.  Two percent are unsure.

94% of Obama’s supporters selected him as their candidate prior to the debate while 3% did so post-debate.  Among Romney’s backers, 96% decided prior to Tuesday night’s debate while 4% made their selection following it.

How did registered voters get their information about the debate?  59% mostly watched it.  This compares with 19% who saw its news coverage.  22% neither tuned in for the debate nor watched the news reports about it.

65% of Democrats and 64% of Republicans viewed the debate firsthand.  This compares with 52% of independent voters.  22% of independents caught the news about the debate while 26% neither watched the debate nor followed its news coverage.

Looking at age, 66% of registered voters 45 years of age or older watched the debate.  This compares with just 48% of those under the age of 45 who did the same.

Table: Candidate Selection Made Before or After Debate (IA Likely Voters)

Table: Information Source for First Presidential Debate (IA Registered Voters)

Majority Views Obama Favorably… Romney’s Image Still in Need of a Makeover

54% of likely voters in Iowa have a positive impression of President Obama while 43% do not.    Three percent are unsure.

In NBC News/WSJ/Marist’s September survey, 53% of Iowa likely voters had a favorable view of Obama while 42% had an unfavorable one.  Five percent, at that time, were unsure.

Romney’s favorability rating is still upside down.  51% of likely voters have an unfavorable opinion of him while 44% have a favorable one.  Five percent are unsure.

In September, half of likely voters — 50% — had an unfavorable view of Romney while 42% had a favorable one.  Eight percent were unsure.

Table: President Barack Obama Favorability (IA Likely Voters)

Table: Mitt Romney Favorability (IA Likely Voters)

A Look at the Vice Presidential Candidates

Likely voters in Iowa divide about Vice President Joe Biden.  47% have a favorable view of him while 46% have an unfavorable one.  Eight percent are unsure.

When NBC News/WSJ/Marist reported this question last month, 44% of Iowa likely voters thought well of Biden.  This compares with 43% who had an unfavorable impression of him.  13%, at that time, were unsure.

44% of likely voters have a favorable opinion of Paul Ryan.  However, 45% have an unfavorable view of the candidate.  11% are unsure.

In September, 40% of Iowa likely voters had a positive view of Ryan.  43% did not, and 17% had either never heard of him or were unsure how to rate him.

Table: Vice President Joe Biden Favorability (IA Likely Voters)

Table: Paul Ryan Favorability (IA Likely Voters)

Obama and Romney Battle Over Economy…Obama Bests Romney on Foreign Policy

Which candidate will do a better job handling the U.S. economy?  46% of registered voters statewide think Obama is the candidate for the job while the same proportion — 46% — has this opinion of Romney.  Nine percent are unsure.  Among Iowa likely voters, 47% perceive the president to be stronger on the issue compared with 46% who believe Romney will turn around the nation’s economy.  Seven percent are unsure.

In September, 46% of Iowa registered voters reported Obama would better handle the economy while 42% said Romney was more capable.  11%, at the time, were unsure.

When it comes to foreign policy, Obama — 51% — outperforms Romney — 39% — among registered voters.  11% are unsure.  Likely voters share these views.  51% of this group believes Obama is better prepared to handle foreign policy issues while 40% think Romney is.  Nine percent are unsure.

In NBC News/WSJ/Marist’s previous survey in the state, 53% of registered voters said Obama was the stronger candidate in the foreign policy realm.  35%, however, thought Romney had the better plan.  12% were unsure.

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling the Economy (IA Registered Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling the Economy (IA Likely Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling Foreign Policy (IA Registered Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling Foreign Policy (IA Likely Voters)

Half Give Obama’s Job Performance Stamp of Approval

Among Iowa registered voters, 50% approve of the job President Obama is doing in office.  This compares with 43% who disapprove.  Six percent are unsure.

Last month, 49% of registered voters statewide applauded the president’s performance while 43% believed he fell short.  Eight percent, then, were unsure.

Table: President Obama Approval Rating in Iowa (IA Registered Voters)

A Nation Off Course?

When it comes to the direction of the country, 47% of registered voters in Iowa say the nation is moving in the wrong direction.  The same proportion — 47% — also thinks it is moving in the right one.  Six percent are unsure.

When NBC News/WSJ/Marist last reported this question in September, 49% believed the country needed a new compass.  However, 43% said the country was on the correct path.  Eight percent, at that time, were unsure.

Table: Right or Wrong Direction of the Country (IA Registered Voters)

How the Survey was Conducted

Nature of the Sample

10/18: Six Point Contest in Wisconsin

President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden — 51% — lead Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan — 45% — among Wisconsin likely voters, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted absentee.  One percent is for another candidate, and only 3% are undecided.

“The battle for Wisconsin’s ten electoral votes looks a lot like it did before the first presidential debate,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion.  “Obama has the advantage over Romney but his lead is less than the double-digit margin he won the state by in 2008.”

Click Here for Complete October 18, 2012 Wisconsin NBC News/WSJ/Marist Poll Release

Click Here for Complete October 18, 2012 Wisconsin NBC News/WSJ/Marist Poll Tables

In NBC News/WSJ/Marist’s September survey in the state, Obama and Biden had the support of 50% of likely voters, including those who were undecided yet leaning toward a candidate.  This compares with 45% who backed Romney and Ryan.  At that time, only 1% was behind another candidate, and 4% were undecided.

Key points:

  • Debate difference?  There is no statistical difference in the support the candidates receive after the presidential debate on Tuesday night than before it.  Only 4% of likely voters say they decided whom to support after this week’s debate.  Prior to the debate, 50% of likely voters supported the president while 45% backed Romney.  Two percent were behind another candidate, and 3% were undecided.  Following the debate, on Wednesday, 51% of likely voters are behind the president while 45% support Romney.  One percent is for another candidate, and 4% are undecided.
  • Party ID.  96% of likely Democratic voters support Obama.  97% of Republicans who are likely to go to the polls are behind Romney.  Among independent likely voters, 48% support Obama compared with 44% for Romney.
  • Enthusiasm.  62% of Wisconsin likely voters are very enthusiastic about voting next month.  This is a slight increase from September when 58% of likely voters said they were very enthusiastic about going to the polls.  Looking at each candidate’s supporters, slightly more Romney backers — 68% — express a high level of enthusiasm compared with 63% of Obama’s supporters who express a similar degree of enthusiasm.  Each candidate has also experienced a boost in their supporters’ enthusiasm.  When NBC News/WSJ/Marist last reported this question in September, 64% of likely voters behind Romney had a high level of enthusiasm compared with 58% of Obama’s backers.
  • Intensity of support.  90% of likely voters in Wisconsin strongly support their choice of candidate.  Eight percent are somewhat committed to their pick while 1% might vote differently on Election Day.  Less than 1% is unsure.  90% of Obama’s supporters are firmly entrenched in his camp.  This compares with 91% of Romney’s backers who say the same.  In September, 86% of Romney backers in Wisconsin said they strongly supported their choice.  87% of likely voters behind Obama were firmly committed to him at that time.
  • Gender.  Obama — 57% — leads Romney — 39% — among women who are likely to vote.  Among men likely to cast a ballot, Romney — 51% — is ahead of Obama — 44%.
  • Age.  Looking at Wisconsin likely voters under the age of 30, 56% support Obama compared with 35% for Romney.  Among those 30 to 44, Obama receives the support of 51% to Romney’s 46%.  Obama — 50% — also edges Romney — 45% — among likely voters 45 to 59 and 50% to 46% among Wisconsin likely voters 60 and older.
  • Already voted.  Only 6% of likely voters in Wisconsin have already cast a ballot.  The president has a commanding lead over Romney — 64% to 35%, among likely voters in Wisconsin who have either voted early or plan to do so before Election Day which represents 15% of the likely electorate.  Romney and Obama are neck and neck — 48% to 47% — among voters who plan to go to the polls on Election Day.

Among registered voters in Wisconsin, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted absentee, Obama and Biden receive 50% to 44% for Romney and Ryan.  Two percent support another candidate while 4% are undecided.

Table: 2012 Presidential Tossup (WI Likely Voters with Leaners and Absentee)

Table: Enthusiasm to Vote (WI Likely Voters)

Table: Intensity of Support (WI Likely Voters)

Table: 2012 Presidential Tossup (WI Registered Voters with Leaners and Absentee)

Round Two: Did Tuesday’s Debate Matter?

95% of likely voters say they made their candidate selection prior to Tuesday night’s debate.  Four percent made their choice after the debate.  One percent is unsure.

94% of Obama’s supporters decided to back him before Tuesday night’s matchup.  This compares with 5% who did so after the debate.  Looking at Romney’s backers, 96% chose him prior to the debate while 3% say Tuesday’s exchange sealed the deal.

When it comes to how Wisconsin registered voters received their information about the debate, 62% watched it while 18% followed the news coverage about it.  20% watched neither the debate nor the news reports about it.

Looking at party, 67% of Republicans and 65% of Democrats watched the debate firsthand.  Among independent voters in Wisconsin, 55% watched the debate, and 22% saw the news coverage about it.  23% of this voting group neither watched the debate nor its news coverage.

Table: Candidate Selection Made Before or After Debate (WI Likely Voters)

Table: Information Source for First Presidential Debate (WI Registered Voters)

Obama Still Viewed Favorably in Wisconsin… Slight Improvement in Romney’s Image

53% of Wisconsin likely voters have a favorable impression of the president while 44% do not.  Three percent are unsure.

Last month, 51% thought well of Obama while 44% had an unfavorable opinion of him.  Four percent, at the time, were unsure.

Romney’s favorability rating in the state is slightly improved from NBC News/WSJ/Marist’s September survey.  47% of likely voters in Wisconsin have a positive impression of him compared with 43% who had a similar view of him last month.  47% have an unfavorable opinion of him now, virtually unchanged from the 46% who held this view in the prior survey.  Six percent are currently unsure.  10% were unsure a month ago.

Table: President Barack Obama Favorability (WI Likely Voters)

Table: Mitt Romney Favorability (WI Likely Voters)

Voters Divide about Biden… Half Think Well of Ryan

47% of likely voters in Wisconsin have a favorable impression of Vice President Joe Biden.  This compares with 46% who have an unfavorable one.  Seven percent are unsure.

Last month, 45% had a less than stellar view of Biden while 42% thought well of him.  12%, at the time, were unsure.

What do Wisconsin likely voters think of their favorite son?  In his home state, Paul Ryan is viewed favorably by 50% of likely voters.  43% have an unfavorable opinion of him, and 7% are unsure.

In NBC News/WSJ/Marist’s previous survey, 49% of likely voters in Wisconsin perceived Ryan favorably while 40% did not.  11% were unsure.

Table: Vice President Joe Biden Favorability (WI Likely Voters)

Table: Paul Ryan Favorability (WI Likely Voters)

Voters Divide about Economy…Obama Tops Romney on Foreign Policy

47% of registered voters in Wisconsin believe Obama will better handle the U.S. economy.  46%, however, have this impression of Romney.  Seven percent are unsure.  Similar proportions of likely voters share these views.  48% of Wisconsin likely voters think Obama is more capable to deal with this issue while 47% say Romney is the candidate to turn around the nation’s economy.  Five percent are unsure.

Last month, 45% of registered voters statewide thought Obama was better prepared to deal with the economy compared with 44% who said Romney was the stronger candidate on the issue.  11% were unsure.

On foreign policy, Obama — 51% — bests Romney — 42% — among Wisconsin registered voters.  Seven percent are unsure.  Among likely voters statewide, 52% believe Obama is the stronger candidate on foreign policy compared with 42% who have this view of Romney.  Six percent are unsure.

When NBC News/WSJ/Marist last reported this question in September, 51% of registered voters gave Obama the nod on foreign policy.  This compares with 39% who thought Romney was the stronger candidate in the realm of foreign policy.  11% were unsure.

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling the Economy (WI Registered Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling the Economy (WI Likely Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling Foreign Policy (WI Registered Voters)

Table: Candidate Who Will Do a Better Job Handling Foreign Policy (WI Likely Voters)

Obama Approval Rating at 49% in Wisconsin

Nearly half of registered voters in Wisconsin — 49% — approve of how President Obama is doing his job.  45% disapprove, and 5% are unsure.

Last month, 48% gave Obama a thumbs-up while 44% said he missed the mark.  Seven percent, at the time, were unsure.

Table: President Obama Approval Rating in Wisconsin (WI Registered Voters)

Nation Needs a New Direction, Says Majority

52% of Wisconsin registered voters think the country is moving in the wrong direction.  44% say it is traveling in the right one, and 4% are unsure.

In September, 54% reported the country was on the wrong road compared with 38% who thought it was on the proper path.  Seven percent were unsure.

Table: Right or Wrong Direction of the Country (WI Registered Voters)

Baldwin and Thompson in Competitive Contest for U.S. Senate in Wisconsin

Democrat Tammy Baldwin receives the support of 49% of likely voters, and Republican Tommy Thompson is backed by 45%, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted absentee.  One percent supports another candidate, and 5% are undecided.

In NBC News/WSJ/Marist’s September survey, 48% of Wisconsin likely voters, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate, backed Baldwin while 46% were for Thompson.  Five percent were undecided.

Among registered voters, including those who are undecided yet leaning toward a candidate and those who voted absentee, Baldwin receives 48% to 45% for Thompson.  One percent is behind another candidate, and 5% are undecided.

Table: 2012 U.S. Senate Tossup in Wisconsin: Baldwin/Thompson (WI Likely Voters with Leaners and Absentee)

Table: 2012 U.S. Senate Tossup in Wisconsin: Baldwin/Thompson (WI Registered Voters with Leaners and Absentee)

How the Survey was Conducted

Nature of the Sample

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